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November 4th, 2010

Glucophage Mg

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Glucophage Mg, on Oct. 15, 2010.]

Advances for paid content on the iPad: We start this week with a whole bunch of data points regarding journalism and mobile devices; I'll try to tie them together for you the best I can. Conde Nast, one of the world's largest magazine publishers, has done the most thorough iPad research we've seen so far, with more than 100 hours of in-person interviews and in-app surveys with more than 5, Glucophage used for, 000 respondents. Conde Nast released some of its findings this week, which included five pieces of advice for mobile advertisers that were heavy on interactivity and clear navigation. They also discovered some good news for mobile advertisers: The iPad's early users aren't simply the typical tech-geek early adopter set, and about four-fifths of them were happy with their experiences with Conde Nast's apps.

MocoNews had the most detailed look at Conde Nast's study, arguing that the fact that iPads are shared extensively means they're not being treated as a mobile device, buy generic Glucophage. Users also seemed to spend much more time with the mobile versions of the magazines than the print versions, though that data's a little cloudy, Glucophage Mg. NPR has also done some research on its users via Twitter and Facebook, and the Lab's Justin Ellis reported that they've found that those listeners are generally younger, hardcore listeners. Together, Facebook and Twitter account for 7 to 8 percent of NPR's web traffic, Online buying Glucophage, though Facebook generates six times as much as Twitter.

There were also a few items on newspapers and the iPad: Forbes' Jeff Bercovici reported that the New York Post will become the first newspaper without a paid website to start selling an iPad app subscription. The subscription is only sold inside the app, a strategy that The Next Web's Martin Bryant called a psychological trick that "makes users feel less like they’re paying for news and more like they’re 'Just buying another app.'" The British newspaper The Financial Times said its iPad app has made about £1 million in advertising revenue since it was launched in May, but as Poynter's Damon Kiesow noted, local papers have been slow to jump on the iPad train, with only a dozen of launching apps so far, Glucophage gel, ointment, cream, pill, spray, continuous-release, extended-release. Glucophage Mg, Meanwhile, GigaOM's Mathew Ingram ripped most magazine iPad apps for a lack of interactivity, openness or user control, saying,"the biggest flaw for me is the total lack of acknowledgment that the device this content appears on is part of the Internet, and therefore it is possible to connect the content to other places with more information about a topic."But some news organizations are already busy preparing for the next big thing: According to The Wall Street Journal, some national news orgs have begun developing content for Samsung's new tablet, the Galaxy, which is scheduled to be released later this year.

Too much of a good story?: Regardless of where you were this week, the huge story was the rescue of 33 Chilean miners who had been trapped underground for more than two months. The fact that it was such an all-encompassing story is, of course, a media story in itself: TV broadcasters planned wall-to-wall coverage beforehand, Herbal Glucophage, and that coverage garnered massive ratings in the U.S. and elsewhere. (We followed on the web, too.) With 2,000 journalists at the site, the event became a global media spectacle the likes of which we haven't seen in a while.

The coverage had plenty of critics, many of them upset about the excessive amount of resources devoted to a story with little long-term impact by news organizations that are making significant cuts to coverage elsewhere, Glucophage Mg. The point couldn't have been finer in the case of the BBC, comprar en línea Glucophage, comprar Glucophage baratos, which spent more than £100,000 on its rescue coverage, leading it to slash the budget for upcoming stories like the Cancun climate change meetings and Lisbon NATO summit.

The sharpest barbs belonged to NYU prof Jay Rosen and Lehigh prof Jeremy Littau"The proportion of response to story impact is perhaps the best illustration of the insanity we seen in media business choices today," Littau wrote, Buy Glucophage without a prescription, adding,"I see an industry chasing hits and page views by wasting valuable economic and human capital." Lost Remote's Steve Safran pointed out that the degree of coverage had much more to do with the fact that coverage could be planned than with its newsworthiness.

Rupert keeps pushing into paywalls: After his Times and Sunday Times went behind a paywall this summer, Rupert Murdoch added another newspaper to his online paid-content empire this week: The British tabloid News of the World. Access to the paper's site will cost a pound a day or £1.99 for four weeks, and will include some web exclusives, including a new video section, no prescription Glucophage online. PaidContent gave the new site itself a good review Glucophage Mg, , saying it's an improvement over the old one.

The business plan behind the paywall didn't get such kind reviews. As with The Times' paywall, News of the World's content will be hidden from Google and other search engines, and while paidContent reported that its videos had been reposted on YouTube before the site even launched, the paper's digital editor told Journalism.co.uk that it's working aggressively to keep its content within the site, Glucophage wiki, including calling in the lawyers if need be. The Press Gazette's Dominic Ponsford argued that the new site formally marks Murdoch's retreat from the web: "Without any inbound or outbound links, and invisible to Google and other search engines, the NotW, Times and Sunday Times don’t really have internet sites – but digitally delivered editions."British journalist Kevin Anderson was a little more charitable, saying the strategy just might be an early step toward a frictionless all-app approach to digital news.

As for Murdoch's other paywall experiment at The Times, Glucophage class, two editors gave a recent talk (reported by Editors Weblog) that juxtaposed two interesting ideas: The editors claimed that a subscription-based website makes them more focused on the user, then touted this as an advantage of the iPad: "People consume how you want them to consume."

News orgs' kibosh on political participation: NPR created a bit of buzz this week when it sent a memo to employees explaining that they were not allowed to attend the upcoming rallies by comedians Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert (unless they were covering the events), as they constitute unethical participation in a political rally. The rule forbidding journalists to participate in political rallies is an old one in newsrooms, and at least eight of the U.S.' largest news organizations told The Huffington Post their journalists also wouldn't be attending the rallies outside of work, Glucophage Mg.

NPR senior VP Dana Davis Rehm explained in a post on its site that NPR issued the memo to clear up any confusion about whether the rallies, which are at least partly satirical in nature, About Glucophage, were in fact political. NPR's fresh implementation prompted a new round of criticism of the longstanding rule, especially from those skeptical of efforts at "objective" journalism: The Wrap's Dylan Stableford called it "insane," Northeastern j-prof Dan Kennedy said the prohibition keeps journalists from observing and learning, and CUNY j-prof Jeff Jarvis made a similar point, arguing that "NPR is forbidding its employees to be curious."

A closer look at Denton and Huffington: In the past week, we've gotten long profiles of two new media magnates in a New Yorker piece on Gawker chief Nick Denton and a Forbes story on Arianna Huffington and her Huffington Post, Glucophage no rx. (Huffington also gave a good Q&A to Investor's Business Daily.) Reaction to the Denton articles was pretty subdued, but former Gawker editor Elizabeth Spiers (who wrote the Huffington piece) had some interesting thoughts about how Gawker has become part of the mainstream, though not everyone agrees whether its success is replicable.

Figures in the pieces prompted Reuters' Felix Salmon and Forbes' Jeff Bercovici to break down the sites' valuation. Glucophage Mg, (Salmon only looks at Gawker, though Bercovici compares the two in traffic value and in their owners' roles.) The two networks have long been rivals, and Denton noted that thanks to a couple of big sports-related scandals, Gawker's traffic beat the Post's for the first time ever this week. Also this week, Rx free Glucophage, Huffington announced she'd pay $250,000 to send buses to Jon Stewart's rally later this month, an idea the Wrap said some of her employees weren't crazy about.

Reading roundup: Busy, busy week this week. We'll see how much good stuff I can point you toward before your eyes start glazing over.

— A few follow-ups to last week's discussion of Howard Kurtz's move from The Washington Post to The Daily Beast: The New York Times' David Carr wrote a lyrical column comparing writing for print and for the web, Glucophage samples, PBS MediaShift's Mark Glaser interviewed Kurtzon Twitter, and former ESPN.com writer Dan Shanoff pointed out that the move from mainstream media to the web began in the sports world.

— An update on the debate over content farms: MediaWeek ran an article explaining why advertisers like them so much; one of those content farms, Demand Media said in an SEC filing that it plans to spend $50 million to $75 million on investments in content next year; and one hyperlocal operation accused of running on a content-farm model, AOL's Patch, responded to its critics' allegations, Glucophage Mg.

— Two interesting discussions between The Guardian and Jeff Jarvis: Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger posted some thoughts about his concept of the Fourth Estate — the traditional press, public media, and the web's public sphere — and Jarvis responded by calling the classification "correct but temporary." The Guardian's Roy Greenslade also wrote about his concern for the news/advertising divide as journalists become entrepreneurs, Glucophage dose, and Jarvis, an entrepreneurial journalism advocate, defended his cause.

— Three other good reads before we're done:

GigaOM's Mathew Ingram told newspapers it's better to join Groupon than to fight it.

Newspaper analyst Alan Mutter laid out French research that illuminates just how far digital natives' values are from those of the newspaper industry — and what a hurdle those newspapers have in reaching those consumers.

Scott Rosenberg looked at the closed systems encroaching on the web and asked a thought-provoking question: Is the openness that has defined the web destined to be just a parenthesis in a longer history of control. It's a big question and, as Rosenberg reminds us, a critical one for the future of news.

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September 14th, 2010

Order Armour

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Order Armour, on Aug. 27, 2010.]

Maintaining accuracy in an SEO-driven world: Apparently the future-of-news world isn't immune to the inevitable dog days of August, because this week was one of the slowest in this corner of the web in the past year. There were still some interesting discussions simmering, so let's take a look, starting with the political controversy du jour: The proposed construction of a Muslim community center in downtown Manhattan near the site of the Sept, Armour dose. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center. I'm not going to delve into the politics of the issue, or even the complaints that this story is symptomatic of a shallow news media more concerned about drummed-up controversy than substantive issues. Instead, I want to focus on the decisions that news organizations have been making about what to call the project, Order Armour. Armour without a prescription, It has predominantly been called the "ground zero mosque," though beginning about two weeks ago, some attention began being trained on news organizations — led most vocally by The New York Times and The Associated Press, which changed its internal label for the story — that wouldn't use that phrase out of a concern for accuracy. The Village Voice used some Google searches to find that while there's been an uptick in news sources' use of the project's proper names (Park51 and the Cordoba Center), "ground zero mosque" is still far and away the most common designation.

What's most interesting about this discussion are the ideas about why a factually inaccurate term has taken such a deep root in coverage of the issue, Armour no prescription, despite efforts to refute it: The Village Voice pointed a finger at cable news, which has devoted the most time to the story, while the Online Journalism Review's Brian McDermott pinpointed our news consumption patterns driven by "warp-speed skimming" and smart-phone headlines that make easy labels more natural for readers and editors."Watery qualifiers like 'near' or 'so-called' don't stick in our brains as much, nor do they help a website climb the SEO ladder."

Poynter ethicist Kelly McBride zeroed in on that idea of search-engine optimization, noting that the AP is being punished for their stand against the term "ground zero mosque" by not appearing very highly on the all-important news searches for that phrase. In order to stay relevant to search engines, Purchase Armour, news organizations have to continue using an inaccurate term once it's taken hold, she concluded. In response, McBride suggested pre-emptively using factchecking resources to nip misconceptions in the bud. Order Armour, "Now that Google makes it impossible to move beyond our distortions -- even when we know better -- we should be prepared," she said.

Google's search and social takes shots: Google takes more than few potshots every week on any number of subjects, but this week, several of them were related to some intriguing future-of-news issues we've been talking about regularly here at the Lab, doses Armour work, so I thought I'd highlight them a bit. Ex-Salon editor Scott Rosenberg took Google News to task for its placement of an Associated Content article at the top of search results on last week's Dr. Laura Schlessinger controversy. Associated Content is the giant "content farm"bought earlier this year by Yahoo, and its Dr. Laura article appears to be a particularly mediocre constructed article cynically designed solely to top Google's ranking for "Dr, Order Armour. Buy generic Armour, Laura n-word."

Rosenberg takes the incident as a sign that reliability of Google News' search results has begun to be eclipsed by content producers' guile: "When Google tells me that this drivel is the most relevant result, I can’t help thinking, the game’s up." The Lab's Jim Barnett also questioned Google CEO Eric Schmidt's recent articulation of the company's idea of automating online serendipity, wondering how a "serendipity algorithm" might shape or limit our worldviews as Google prefers.

Google's social-media efforts also took a few more hits, with Slate's Farhad Manjoo conducting a postmortem on Google Wave, homing in on its ill-defined purpose and unnecessary complexity, buy Armour from canada. Google should have positioned Wave as an advanced tool for sophisticated users, Manjoo argued, but the company instead clumsily billed it as the possible widespread successor to email and instant messenging. Meanwhile, Adam Rifkin of GigaOM criticized the company's acquisition of the social app company Slide (and its social-media attempts in general), Armour blogs, advising Google to buy companies whose products fit well into its current offerings, rather than chasing after the social-gaming industry — which he said "feels like it’s about to collapse on itself."

WikiLeaks, stateless news and transparency: The saga of the open-source leaking website WikiLeaks took a very brief, bizarre turn this weekend, when reports emerged early Saturday that founder Julian Assange was wanted by Swedish authorities for rape, then later that day prosecutors announced he was no longer a suspect. The New York Times provided some great background Order Armour, on Assange's cat-and-mouse games with various world governments, including the United States, which is reportedly considering charging him under the Espionage Act for WikiLeaks' release last month of 92,000 pages of documents regarding the war in Afghanistan.

No one really had any idea what to make of this episode, Armour dangers, and few were bold enough to make any strong speculations publicly. Two bloggers explored the (possible) inner workings of the situation, with Nicholas Mead using it to argue that catching Assange isn't exactly going to stop WikiLeaks — as NYU professor Jay Rosen noted last month, WikiLeaks is the first truly stateless news organization, something only permitted by the structure of the web.

That slippery, Armour recreational, stateless nature extends to WikiLeaks' funding, which The Wall Street Journal focused on this week in a fine feature. Unlike the wide majority of news organizations, there is virtually no transparency to WikiLeaks' funding, though the Journal did piece together a few bits of information: The site has raised $1 million this year, much of its financial network is tied to Germany's Wau Holland Foundation, and two unnamed American nonprofits serve as fronts for the site, Armour trusted pharmacy reviews.

Hyperlocal news and notes: A few hyperlocal news-related ideas and developments worth passing along: Sarah Hartley, who works on The Guardian's hyperlocal news efforts, wrote a thoughtful post attempting to define "hyperlocal" in 10 characteristics. Hyperlocal, she argues, is no longer defined by a tight geographical area, but by an attitude, Order Armour. She follows with a list of defining aspects, such as obsessiveness, Where to buy Armour, fact/opinion blending, linking and community participation. It's a great list, though it seems Hartley may be describing the overarching blogging ethos more so than hyperlocal news per se. (Steve Yelvington, for one, says the term is meaningless.)

Brad Flora at PBS MediaShift provided a helpful list of blogs for hyperlocal newsies to follow (disclosure: The Lab is one of them), buying Armour online over the counter. And two online media giants made concrete steps in long-expected moves toward hyperlocal news: Microsoft's Bing launched its first hyperlocal product with a restaurant guide in Portland, and Yahoo began recruiting writers for a local news site in the San Francisco area.

Reading roundup Order Armour, : Despite the slow news week, there's no shortage of thoughtful pieces on stray subjects that are worth your time. Here's a quick rundown:

— Spot.Us founder David Cohn wrote an illuminating post comparing journalists' (particularly young ones') current search for a way forward in journalism to the ancient Israelites' 40 years of wandering in the desert. TBD's Steve Buttry, a self-described "old guy, Armour no rx, "responded that it may not take a generation to find the next iteration of journalism but said his generation has been responsible for holding innovation back: "We might make it out of the desert, but I think our generation has blown our chance to lead the way."

— A couple of interesting looks at developing stories online: Terry Heaton posited that one reason for declining trust in news organizations is their focus on their own editorial voice to the detriment of the public's understanding (something audiences see in stark relief when comparing coverage of developing news), and Poynter's Steve Myers used the Steven Slater story to examine how news spreads online.

— At The Atlantic, Tim Carmody wrote a fantastic overview of the pre-web history of reading.

— In an argument that mirrors the discussions about the values of the new news ecosystem, former ESPN.com writer Dan Shanoffgave a case for optimism about the current diffused, buy cheap Armour, democratized state of sports media.

— Another glass-half-full post: Mike Mandel broke down journalism job statistics and was encouraged by what he found.

— Finally, for all the students headed back to class right now, the Online Journalism Review's Robert Niles has some of the best journalism-related advice you'll read all year.

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January 30th, 2010

A quick guide to the maxims of new media

December 19th, 2009

This week in media musings: The Demand Media invasion, and ‘objectivity’ trumps transparency