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January 10th, 2011

Purchase Zoloft

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Purchase Zoloft, on Dec. 10, 2010.]

Only one topic really grabbed everyone's attention this week in future-of-news circles (and most of the rest of the world, too): WikiLeaks. To make the story a bit easier to digest, I've divided it into two sections — the crackdown on WikiLeaks, and its implications for journalism. Buy no prescription Zoloft online, Attacks and counterattacks around WikiLeaks: Since it released 250,000 confidential diplomatic cables last week, WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, have been at the center of attacks by governments, international organizations, and private businesses. The forms and intensity they've taken have seemed unprecedented, buy Zoloft online no prescription, though Daniel Ellsberg said he faced all the same things when he leaked the Pentagon Papers nearly 40 years ago.

Here's a rundown of what's happened since late last week: Both Amazon and the domain registry EveryDNS.net booted WikiLeaks, leaving it scrambling to stay online, Purchase Zoloft. (Here's a good conversation between Ethan Zuckerman and The Columbia Journalism Review on the implications of Amazon's decision.) PayPal, the company that WikiLeaks uses to collect most of its donations, cut off service to WikiLeaks, too. PayPal later relented, Low dose Zoloft, but not before botching its explanation of whether U.S. government pressure was involved.

On the government side, the Library of Congress blocked WikiLeaks, and Assange surrendered to British authorities on a Swedish sexual assault warrant (the evidence for which David Cay Johnston said the media should be questioning) and is being held without bail. Slate's Jack Shafer said the arrest could be a blessing in disguise Purchase Zoloft, for Assange.

WikiLeaks obviously has plenty of critics: Christopher Hitchens called Assange a megalomaniac who's "made everyone complicit in his own private decision to try to sabotage U.S. foreign policy," and U.S, discount Zoloft. Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Joe Lieberman called for Assange and The New York Times, respectively, to be prosecuted via the Espionage Act. But WikiLeaks' many online defenders also manifested themselves this week, too, as hundreds of mirror sites cropped up when WikiLeaks' main site was taken down, Zoloft maximum dosage, and various online groups attacked the sites of companies that had pulled back on services to WikiLeaks. By Wednesday, it was starting to resemble what Dave Winer called "a full-out war on the Internet."

Search Engine Land's Danny Sullivan looked at the response by WikiLeaks' defenders to argue that WikiLeaks will never be blocked, and web pioneer Mark Pesce said that WikiLeaks has formed the blueprint for every group like it to follow, Purchase Zoloft. Many other writers and thinkers lambasted the backlash against WikiLeaks, including Reporters Without Borders, Business Insider's Henry BlodgetRoberto Arguedas at Gizmodo, BoingBoing's Xeni Jardin, Wired's Evan Hansen, where can i buy Zoloft online, and David Samuels of The Atlantic.

Four defenses of WikiLeaks' rights raised particularly salient points: First, NYU prof Clay Shirky argued that while WikiLeaks may prove to be damaging in the long run, democracy needs it to be protected in the short run: "If it’s OK for a democracy to just decide to run someone off the internet for doing something they wouldn’t prosecute a newspaper for doing, the idea of an internet that further democratizes the public sphere will have taken a mortal blow." Second, CUNY j-prof Jeff Jarvis said that WikiLeaks fosters a critical power shift from secrecy to transparency. Zoloft blogs, Finally, GigaOM's Mathew Ingram and Salon's Dan Gillmor made similar points about the parallel between WikiLeaks' rights and the press's First Amendment rights. Whether we agree with them or not, Assange and WikiLeaks are protected under the same legal umbrella as The New York Times, they argued, and every attack on the rights of the former is an attack on the latter's rights, too. Purchase Zoloft, "If journalism can routinely be shut down the way the government wants to do this time, we'll have thrown out free speech in this lawless frenzy," Gillmor wrote.

WikiLeaks and journalism: In between all the attacks and counterattacks surrounding him, buy Zoloft from mexico, Julian Assange did a little bit of talking of his own this week, too. He warned about releasing more documents if he's prosecuted or killed, including possible Guantánamo Bay files. He defended WikiLeaks in an op-ed in The Australian. He answered readers' questions at The Guardian, Zoloft canada, mexico, india, and dodged one about diplomacy that started an intriguing discussion at Jay Rosen's Posterous. When faced with the (rather pointless) question of whether he's a journalist, he responded with a rather pointless answer, Purchase Zoloft.

Fortunately, plenty of other people did some deep thinking about what WikiLeaks means for journalism and society. (The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal has a far more comprehensive list of those people's thoughts here.) Former Guardian web editor Emily Bell argued that WikiLeaks has awakened journalism to a renewed focus on the purpose behind what it does, as opposed to its current obsession with the models by which it achieves that purpose. Here at the Lab, USC grad student Nikki Usher listed a few ways that WikiLeaks shows that both traditional and nontraditional journalism matter and pointed out the value of the two working together.

At the Online Journalism Review, Zoloft from canadian pharmacy, Robert Niles said that WikiLeaks divides journalists into two camps: "Those who want to see information get to the public, by whatever means, and those who want to control the means by which information flows." Honolulu Civil Beat editor John Temple thought a bit about what WikiLeaks means for small, local news organizations like his, and British j-prof Paul Bradshaw used WikiLeaks as a study in how to handle big data dumps journalistically. Purchase Zoloft, Also at the Lab, CUNY j-prof C.W. Anderson had some thoughts about this new quasi-source in the form of large databases, Buying Zoloft online over the counter, and how journalists might be challenged to think about it. Finally, if you're looking for some deep thoughts on WikiLeaks in audio form, Jay Rosen has you covered — in short form at PBS MediaShift, and at quite a bit more length with Dave Winer on their Rebooting the News podcast.

How porous should paywalls be?: Meanwhile, the paid-content train chugs along, led by The New York Times, australia, uk, us, usa, which is still planning on instituting its paywall next year. The Times' digital chief, Martin Nisenholtz, dropped a few more details this week about how its model will work, again stressing that the site will remain open to inbound links across the web.

But for the first time, Nisenholtz also stressed the need to limit the abuse of those links as a way to get inside the wall without paying, revealing that The Times will be working with Google to limit the number of times a reader can access Times articles for free via its search, Purchase Zoloft. Nisenholtz also hinted at the size of the paywall's target audience, Buy Zoloft from canada, leading Poynter's Rick Edmonds to estimate that The Times will be focusing on about 6 million "heavy users of the site."

Reuters' Felix Salmon was skeptical of Nisenholtz's stricter paywall plans, saying that they won't be worth the cost: "Strengthening your paywall sends the message that you don’t trust your subscribers, or your subscribers’ non-subscriber friends: you’re treating them as potential content thieves." The only way such a strategy would make sense, he said, is if The Times is considering starting at a very high price point, something like $20 a month. Henry Blodget of Business Insider, on the other hand, Zoloft schedule, is warming to the idea of a paywall for The Times.

In other paid-content news: News Corp.'s Times of London, which is running a very different paywall from The New York Times, may have only 54,000 people accessing content behind it, according to research by the competing Guardian. Zoloft dosage, The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle announced it's launching an metered model powered by Steve Brill's Press+, a plan Steve Yelvington defended and Matthew Terenzio questioned. Purchase Zoloft, While one paid-content plan gets started, another one might be coming to an end: Newsday is taking its notoriously unsuccessful paywall down through next month, and several on Twitter guessed that the move would become permanent. One news organization that's not going to be a pioneer in paid online news: The Washington Post, as Post Co. CEO Don Graham said at a conference this week.

Reading roundup: Other than the ongoing WikiLeaks brouhaha, it's been a relatively quiet week on the future-of-news front. Here's a bit of what else went on:

— Web guru Tim O'Reilly held his News Foo Camp in Arizona last weekend, and since it was an intentionally quiet event, it didn't dominate the online discussion like many such summits do. Still, there were a few interesting post-Newsfoo pieces for the rest of us to chew on, including a roundup of the event by TBD's Steve Buttry, Alex Hillman's reflections, and USC j-prof Robert Hernandez's thoughts on journalists' calling a lie a lie, Purchase Zoloft.

— A few iPad bits: News media marketer Earl Wilkinson wrote about a possible image problem with the iPad, All Things Digital's Peter Kafka reported on the negotiations between Apple and publishers on iTunes subscriptions, and The New York Times' David Nolen gave some lessons from designing election results for the iPad.

— The Guardian's Sarah Hartley interviewed former TBD general manager Jim Brady about the ambitious local online-TV project, and Lost Remote's Cory Bergman looked at TBD and other local TV online branding efforts.

— Advertising Age's Ann Marie Kerwin has an illuminating list of 10 trends in global media consumption.

— Finally, two good pieces from the Lab: Harvard prof Nicholas Christakis on why popularity doesn't equal influence on social media, and The New York Times' Aron Pilhofer and Jennifer Preston provided a glimpse into how one very influential news organization is evolving on social media.

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December 3rd, 2010

Synthroid For Sale

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Synthroid For Sale, on Dec. 3, 2010.]

We're covering two weeks instead of the usual one in this review, so there's a ton to pack in here. I'll try to zip through it a little more quickly than usual.

What to make of WikiLeaks: WikiLeaks made its third big document drop since this summer this week, releasing about 250,000 confidential diplomatic cables. Here's coverage by The New York Times, Synthroid duration,  The GuardianDer Spiegel, and a roundup by The Columbia Journalism Review. Time talked to WikiLeaks' Julian Assange about the leak, and Forbes published an interview and long piece about Assange's next target — corporate America, Synthroid For Sale.

As for the leak itself, The Guardian detailed the documents' path from the alleged leaker, U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, to Assange, to a Guardian reporter. Yahoo's Michael Calderone looked at The Times' editorial process with the cables, purchase Synthroid for sale, including the revelation that they got them from The Guardian, not WikiLeaks. The Wall Street Journal and CNN both declined to sign agreements with WikiLeaks to see the documents in advance, and The Journal examined news orgs' decisions on whether or not to publish. The Times explained its own publishing decision, then (quite eloquently) responded to readers' objections. Synthroid For Sale, The reaction against WikiLeaks was quicker and harsher than those following each of its last two leaks. Before the documents were released, its site was hacked, the U.S. Purchase Synthroid online no prescription, and British governments issued pre-emptive condemnations, and senators called for WikiLeaks to be prosecuted. After the release, the Obama administration said it was indeed pursuing a criminal investigation, Interpol revealed it has put out a call for Assange's arrest (ostensibly for his rape accusations), and Amazon booted WikiLeaks from its servers under pressure from U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman, Synthroid For Sale.

WikiLeaks' actions left many journalists and media observers divided: An Economist blogger accused WikiLeaks of degenerating into gossip, and even Wikipedia co-founder Larry Sanger called them enemies of the American people. Assange and WikiLeaks had their defenders, purchase Synthroid, too: Slate's Jack Shafer praised them for puncturing "the prerogative of secrecy," and another Economist blogger made a similar argument. The Guardian's Simon Jenkins noted that "the job of the media is not to protect power from embarrassment." Meanwhile, Northeastern j-prof Dan Kennedy wrestled with the balance between transparency and secrecy.

Others' primary concern was not value judgments, but classification. Is WikiLeaks  Synthroid For Sale, espionage. Journalism? Radically open government? Or, as CUNY j-prof C.W. Purchase Synthroid online, Anderson argued, is it a facilitator of real-time history documentation. NYU j-prof Jay Rosen hashed out his thoughts on WikiLeaks as a stateless news organization on video, concluding, "The watchdog press died, and what we have is WikiLeaks instead." Paul Balcerak wondered why WikiLeaks gets so much more attention than the press's own reporting.

If you really want to spend the weekend pondering the meaning of WikiLeaks, it's best to start with two posts: Some incisive questions by Salon's Dan Gillmor, and a brilliant post by Aaron Bady sifting through Assange's own words to determine his motivations behind WikiLeaks' radical transparency.

Rupert's big tablet splash: We've heard bits and pieces about Rupert Murdoch's planned tablet-based national news publication, but we got the first substantive report on the subject two weeks ago from Women's Wear Daily, Synthroid For Sale. Among the key details: It's going by The Daily, Synthroid price, coupon, it has a staff of 100, it'll cost 99 cents a week, and it'll come out once a day. The New York Observer gave us some more information about the publication's design (it's text-first and will be published overnight, but apparently looks pretty cool). Other tidbits: John Gruber at Daring Fireball heard that it'll pioneer a new app subscription API from Apple, and New York's Gabriel Snyder said it will have a centrist editorial outlook.

The reasons why this project is getting so much pre-launch attention seem pretty readily evident: Murdoch, Synthroid mg, original tablet news org, iPad news subscriptions, you know the rest. As The Columbia Journalism Review noted Synthroid For Sale, , what's new about this publication is that it won't even have a website. The initial response from the media-watching world was predominantly negative, with skepticism coming from The New York Times' David Carr, Gawker's Ryan TateScott RosenbergSam Diaz of ZDNet, GigaOM's Mathew Ingram, Fast Company's Kit Eaton, comprar en línea Synthroid, comprar Synthroid baratos, The Guardian's Emily Bell, and paidContent's Andrew Wallenstein.

Many of those critics made similar points, so here's a roundup of the main ones: 1) It's trying to impose slow print-think onto the speed-oriented world of mobile media (this is Rosenberg's main point); 2) The fact that it won't have inbound or outbound links means it can't share in the virality that makes news on the Web work; 3) The folks on board don't exactly seem like the tech revolutionaries they might need to be (Wallenstein's main point); and 4) How many people are actually going to pay for this, and can it really cover The Daily's costs. (Carr's main objection)

Several of those people also noted a few factors in Murdoch's favor: Carr argued that people will be more likely to pay for news in an app world than on the web, and both Tate and Eaton noted that Apple's Steve Jobs (who is reported to be tied to the project) is a pretty powerful guy with a history of success in ventures like these. We got a few good suggestions for Murdoch's project, Doses Synthroid work, too: TechCrunch's Erick Schonfeld said to make it local, real-time, and social; Frederic Filloux wanted it speedy, simple, beyond Apple, and with adjustable pricing; and at paidContent, Nic Newman wanted to see a mixture of free and paid content.

Designing apps for tablets and mobile media: Murdoch isn't the only one with a big new tablet app to unveil: Yahoo's Joe Pompeo summarized two others — mini-magazines called Nomad Editions and a new iPad magazine by Virgin called Project, Synthroid For Sale. Of those, Project, announced Tuesday, ordering Synthroid online, got a bit more attention. PaidContent had some details about its video cover and "living magazine" mindset, and All Things Digital's Peter Kafka pointed out the magazine's rather intimidating instruction page, though David Carr told NPR it's still pretty magazine-like.

Also in the process of launching: Next Issue Media, a joint venture by several magazine magnates, will launch its digital newsstand early next year and gave some details to MediaWeek, and Swedish publisher Bonnier, Synthroid photos, whose Mag+ everyone loved, is expanding into News+. Meanwhile, the Financial Times' iPad app is doing well, but The Guardian's Dan Sabbagh remained skeptical that most newspapers' iPad apps will be able to stand out among the sea of more enjoyable apps.

A couple more smart thoughts on mobile media: PaidContent founder Rafat Ali talked about Synthroid For Sale, designing for touchscreens, and Poynter's Damon Kiesow argued that smartphones are fundamentally a mobile device, while the iPad is a leisure device, so their apps can't be imposed onto each other: "To fully serve and engage an audience, an app needs to target one distinctive strength — either location or leisure — and make the content and experience fit that use."

Gawker grows beyond the blog: In advance of its coming overhaul early next year, Gawker head Nick Denton wrote a manifesto explaining why the network of sites is going beyond the blog format (his post at the previous link is in the sites' new design). Denton said he's discovered the new formula for online media success: Not so much Gawker's former trademark snarky meta-analysis, but a few huge juicy scoops accompanied by a steady stream of aggregation, all with a visual bent. He extended the model to include advertising and branding as well.

Reuters' Felix Salmon responded with a meticulous analysis of Gawker's new direction, Synthroid description, noting that while Denton was the first person to make blogging into "a large-scale commercial venture," he's now aggressively dumping blogging's defining reverse-chronological format. Ron Mwangaguhunga of eMedia Vitals compared Gawker's new model with a TV business model, and Anil Dash said that while Gawker is still a blog, it's borrowing Twitter's design that emphasizes both content and the stream of news. "By allowing that flow to continue regardless of which particular piece of embedded content has caught your eye, Gawker and Twitter are just showing the vibrancy and resilience of the format."

Why Twitter matters: Speaking of Twitter, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger offered a stirring defense of Twitter's meaning for journalism as part of a lecture on the state of the Fourth Estate. His list of 15 reasons Twitter matters covers most everything: Reporting, conversation, aggregation, search, marketing, authority, writing, Synthroid For Sale. Likewise, Synthroid street price, GigaOM's Mathew Ingram argued that Twitter's real cultural power "could well be that it is the simplest, the easiest and arguably one of the most efficient forms of mass publishing — or at least micro-publishing — ever invented."

Later, Ingram took Twitter co-founder Biz Stone's apparently off-the-cuff statement that Twitter could develop a news network as an opportunity to think about how news orgs could filter Twitter into a usable crowdsourced newswire. And MediaBistro talked with Canada's National Post to get a sense of how one major newspaper uses Twitter.

Business-model developments and discussion: A few notes on the ever-evolving paid-content front: At least two more news organizations are using the Press+ system of Steve Brill's Journalism Online for their online revenue goals — ProPublica, which is using it to solicit donations online, and Oklahoma State's Daily O'Collegian, which will charge outside-the-area readers. Over at The Guardian, Cory Doctorow examined The Times of London's paywall numbers, and CrunchGear's Devin Coldewey thought out loud about a possible online paid-content system, order Synthroid from United States pharmacy.

Meanwhile, British journalist Kevin Anderson wrote a post arguing that value-added journalism has to be developed with specific revenue streams in mind. Howard Owens of The Batavian countered Synthroid For Sale, that would-be entrepreneurial journalists need to focus more on basic local events journalism than "adding value" or analytical journalism, and TBD's Steve Buttry tried to bring the two perspectives together.

Reading roundup: Here's what else you should see this week, in the quickest-hit form I can give it to you:

— A British court upheld a stipulation that news organizations can charge paid online news monitoring agencies for using their content. The TelegraphTechCrunch Europe, and the Press Gazette explain why it's bad news for aggregators.

— No less an authority than World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee joined the chorus of people extolling the value of data journalism during a panel. A somewhat related debate broke out when Mark Luckie opined on the myths about digital journalism skills. Discount Synthroid, Journalist Andy Boyle disputed Luckie's claims about what new-media skills journalists need (and don't need) to know, and j-prof Mindy McAdams and journalist Brian Manzullo chimed in. Anthony DeBarros and Robert Hernandez turned the discussion toward data journalism, with Hernandez asserting that programming doesn't replace the story. That got Michelle Minkoff kind of riled up, Synthroid For Sale.

— The New York Times ran an article looking at the ways technology is creating increased distractions for young people, which was met by smart rebuttals by Duke prof Cathy Davidson and the Lab's own Megan Garber.

— Also at the Lab: USC prof Henry Jenkins on his concept of "spreadable" media.

— Mashable's Vadim Lavrusik wrote a great roundup of what's going on at the intersection of investigative journalism and social media.

— Finally, if you're looking for a single document to answer the question, "How should newspapers adapt to this new media environment?" you can't do much better than John Paton's presentation on how he's turned around the Journal Register Co. It's brilliant.

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December 3rd, 2010

Buy Lipitor No Prescription

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Buy Lipitor No Prescription, on Nov. 12, 2010.]

Olbermann and objectivity: Another week, another journalist or pundit disciplined for violating a news organization's codes against appearances of bias: This week (actually, late last week) it was Keith Olbermann, liberal commentator for the liberal cable news channel MSNBC, suspended for donating money to Democratic congressional candidates, in violation of NBC News policy. Lipitor use, Olbermann issued an apology (though, as Forbes' Jeff Bercovici noted, it was laced with animus toward MSNBC), and returned to the air Tuesday. There were several pertinent peripheral bits to this story — Olbermann was reportedly suspended for his refusal to apologize on air, it's unclear whether NBC News' rules have actually applied to MSNBC, numerous other journalists have done just what Olbermann did — but that's the gist of it.

By now, we've all figured out what happens next: Scores of commentators weighed in on the appropriateness (or lack thereof) of Olbermann's suspension and NBC's ban on political contributions, Lipitor blogs. The primary arguments boiled down to the ones expressed by Poynter's Bob Steele and NYU's Jay Rosen in this Los Angeles Times piece: On one side, donating to candidates means journalists are acting as political activists, which corrodes their role as fair, independent reporters in the public interest, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. On the other, being transparent is a better way for journalists to establish trust with audiences than putting on a mask of objectivity.

Generally falling in the first camp are fellow MSNBC host Rachel Maddow ("We're a news operation. The rules around here are part of how you know that."), Northeastern j-prof Dan Kennedy (though he tempered his criticism of Olbermann in a second post), and The New York Times' David Carr ("Why merely annotate events when you can tilt the playing field?"). The Columbia Journalism Review was somewhere in the middle, Lipitor pics, saying Olbermann shouldn't be above the rules, but wondering if those rules need to change.

There were plenty of voices Buy Lipitor No Prescription, in the second camp, including the American Journalism Review's Rem RiederMichael Kinsley at Politico, and Lehigh j-prof Jeremy Littau all arguing for transparency.

Slate media critic Jack Shafer used the flap to urge MSNBC to let Olbermann and Maddow fly free as well-reported, openly partisan shows in the vein of respected liberal and conservative political journals. Jay Rosen took the opportunity to explain his pet phrase "The view from nowhere," which tweaks traditional journalism's efforts to "advertise the viewlessness of the news producer" as a means of gaining trust. He advocates transparency instead, and Terry Heaton provided statistics showing that the majority of young adults don't mind journalists' bias, as long as they're upfront about it.

On The Media's Brooke Gladstone summed up the issue well: "Ultimately, kjøpe Lipitor på nett, köpa Lipitor online, it’s the reporting that matters, reporting that is undistorted by attempts to appear objective, reporting that calls a lie a lie right after the lie, not in a box labeled “analysis,” reporting that doesn't distort truth by treating unequal arguments equally."

Commodify your paywall: We talked quite a bit last week about the new numbers on the paywall at Rupert Murdoch's Times of London, and new items in that discussion kept popping up this week. The Times released a few more details (flattering ones, Lipitor mg, naturally) about its post-paywall web audience. Among the most interesting figures is that the percentage of U.K.-based visitors to The Times' site has more than doubled since February, rising to 75 percent, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. Post-paywall visitors are also visiting the website more frequently and are more wealthier, according to News Corp.

Of course, the overall number of visitors is still way down, and the plan continued to draw heat. In a wide-ranging interview on Australian radio, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger expressed surprise at the fact that The Times' print circulation dropped as their print-protectionist paywall went up. That, Lipitor dangers, he said, "suggests to me that we overlook the degree to which the digital forms of our journalism act as a kind of sort of marketing device for the newspapers." ResourceWebs' Evan Britton gave five reasons why news paywalls won't work, and Kachingle founder Cynthia Typaldos argued that future news paywalls will be tapping into a limited pool of people willing to pay for news on the web, squeezing each other out of the same small market.

Clay Shirky used The Times' paywall as a basis for some smart thoughts Buy Lipitor No Prescription, about why newspaper paywalls don't work in general. The Times' paywall represents old thinking, Shirky wrote (and the standard argument against it has been around just as long), but The Times' paywall feels differently because it's being taken as a "referendum on the future." Shirky said The Times is turning itself into a newsletter, Buy Lipitor without prescription, without making any fundamental modifications to its product or the basic economics of the web. "Paywalls do indeed help newspapers escape commodification, but only by ejecting the readers who think of the product as a commodity. This is, invariably, most of them," he wrote.

A conversation about blogging, voice, and ego: A singularly insightful conversation about blogging was sparked this week by Marc Ambinder, Lipitor canada, mexico, india, who wrote a thoughtful goodbye post at his long-running blog at The Atlantic. In it, Ambinder parsed out differences between good print journalism (ego-free, reliant on the unadorned facts for authority) and blogging (ego-intensive, requires the writer to inject himself into the narrative). With the switch from blogging to traditional reporting, Ambinder said, "I will no longer be compelled to turn every piece of prose into a personal, conclusive argument, to try and fit it into a coherent framework that belongs to a web-based personality called 'Marc Ambinder' that people read because it's 'Marc Ambinder,' rather than because it's good or interesting."

The folks at the fantastically written blog Snarkmarket used the post as a launching point for their own thoughts about the nature of blogging, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. Matt Thompson countered that Ambinder was reducing an incredibly diverse form into a single set of characteristics, taking particular exception to Ambinder's ego dichotomy. Lipitor dosage, Tim Carmody mused on blogging, voice, and authorship; and Robin Sloan defended Ambinder's decision to leave the "Thunderdome of criticism" that is political blogging. If you care at all about blogging or writing for the web in general, make sure to give all four posts a thorough read.

TBD's (possible) content/aggregation conflict: The new Washington-based local news site TBD has been very closely watchedsince it was launched in August, and it hit its first big bump in the road late last week, as founding general manager Jim Bradyresigned in quite a surprising move. In a memo Buy Lipitor No Prescription, to TBD employees, TBD owner Robert Allbritton (who also launched Politico) said Brady left because of "stylistic differences" with Allbritton. Despite the falling-out, Lipitor duration, Brady, a washingtonpost.com veteran, spoke highly of where TBD is headed in an email to staff and a few tweets.

But the immediate questions centered on the nature of those differences between Allbritton and Brady. FishbowlDC reported and Business Insider's Henry Blodget inferred from Allbritton's memo that the conflict came down to an original-content-centric model (Allbritton) and a more aggregation-based model (Brady). Brady declared his affirmation of both pieces — he told Poynter's Steve Myers he's pro-original content and the conflict wasn't old media/new media, but didn't go into many more details — but that didn't keep Blodget from taking the aggregation side: The web, My Lipitor experience, he said, "has turned aggregation into a form of content--and a very valuable one at that." Lost Remote's Cory Bergman, meanwhile, noted that while creating content is expensive, Allbritton's made the necessary investments and made it profitable before with Politico.

A new iPad app and competitor: There were two substantive pieces of tablet-related news this week: First, The Washington Post released its iPad app, accompanying its launch with a fun ad most everyone seemed to enjoy, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. Poynter's Damon Kiesow wrote a quick summary of the app, which got a decent review from The Post's Rob Pegoraro. For you design geeks, Sarah Sampsel wrote two good posts about the app design process, Lipitor over the counter.

The other tablet tidbit was the release of Samsung's Galaxy Tab, which runs on Google's Android system. Kiesow rounded up a few of the initial reviews from All Things Digital (a real iPad competitor, though the iPad is better), The New York Times (beautiful with some frustrations), Wired (more convenient than the iPad, but has stability problems) and Gizmodo ("a grab bag of neglect, Lipitor from mexico, good intentions and poor execution"). Buy Lipitor No Prescription, Kiesow also added a few initial impressions of the Galaxy's implications for publishers, predicting that as it takes off, it will put pressure on publishers to move to HTML5 mobile websites, rather than developing native apps.

In other tablet news, MediaWeek looked at the excitement the iPad is generating within the media industry, but ESPN exec John Skipper isn't buying the hype, telling MarketWatch's Jon Friedman, "Whenever a new platform comes up, people want to take the old platform and transport it to the new platform." It didn't work on the Internet, Skipper said, it won't work on the iPad either, generic Lipitor.

Reading roundup: More thoughtful stuff about news and the web was written this week than most normal people have time to get to. Here's a sample:

— First, a piece of news: U.S. News & World Report announced last week that it's dropping its regular print edition and going essentially online-only, only printing single-topic special issues for newsstand sales. The best analysis on the move was at Advertising Age, Buy Lipitor No Prescription.

— Two great pieces on journalism's collaborative future: Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger in essay form, and UBC j-prof Alfred Hermida in audio and slide form. Where can i buy cheapest Lipitor online, — Poynter published an essay by NYU professor Clay Shirky on "the shock of inclusion" in journalism and the obsolescence of the term "consumer." Techdirt's Mike Masnick added a few quick thoughts of his own.

— Two cool posts on data journalism — an overview on its rise by The Columbia Journalism Review's Lauren Kirchner, and a list of great tools by Michelle Minkoff.

— Finally, two long thinkpieces on Facebook that, quite honestly, I haven't gotten to read yet — one by Zadie Smith at The New York Review of Books, and the other by The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal. I'm going to spend some time with them this weekend, and I have a feeling you probably should, too.

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November 4th, 2010

Armour Over The Counter

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Armour Over The Counter, on Oct. 29, 2010.]

Coverage of WikiLeaks gets personal: There were two big stories everyone spent the whole week talking about, and both actually happened late last week. We'll start with what's easily the bigger one in the long term: WikiLeaks' release last Friday of 400,000 documents regarding the Iraq War. The Iraq War Logs were released in partnership with several news organizations around the world, including Al-Jazeera, Armour scheduleThe New York TimesDer Spiegel and Le Monde. (The Columbia Journalism Review wrote a good roundup of the initial coverage.)

The Guardian and The Times in particular used the documents to put together some fascinating pieces of data journalism, and The Columbia Journalism Review's Lauren Kirchner looked at how they did it. Armour long term, The folks at Journalism.co.uk wrote a couple of postsdetailing WikiLeaks' collaborative efforts on the release, particularly their work with the new British nonprofit Bureau of Investigative Journalism. A French nonprofit that also worked with WikiLeaks, OWNI, told its own story of the project, Armour Over The Counter.

Despite all that collaborative work, the news coverage of the documents fizzled over the weekend and into this week, leading two reporting vets to write to the media blog Romenesko to posit reasons why the traditional media helped throw cold water on the story. John Parker pointed to the military press — "Too many military reporters in the online/broadcast field have simply given up their watchdog role for the illusion of being a part of power" — and David Cay Johnston urged journalists to check out the documents, rather than trusting official sources.

There was another WikiLeaks-related story that got almost as much press as the documents themselves: The internal tension at the organization and the ongoing mystery surrounding its frontman, Armour treatment, Julian Assange. The Times and the British paper The Independent both dug into those issues, and Assange walked out of a CNN interview after repeated questions about sexual abuse allegations he's faced in Sweden. That coverage was met with plenty of criticism — Assange and The Columbia Journalism Review ripped CNN, and Salon blogger Glenn Greenwald joined Assange in tearing into The Times. Armour Over The Counter, After being chastised by the U.S. Defense Department this summer for not redacting names of informants in its Afghanistan leak this summer, WikiLeaks faced some criticism this time around from Forbes' Jeff Bercovici and Gawker's John Cook for going too far with the redaction. Armour without a prescription, A few other WikiLeaks-related strains of thought: Mark Feldstein at the American Journalism Review compared WikiLeaks with old-school investigative journalism, Barry Schuler wondered whether the governmental animosity toward WikiLeaks will lead to regulations of the Internet, and CUNY j-prof Jeff Jarvis wrote about the way WikiLeaks is bringing us toward the dawn of the age of transparency. "Only when and if government realizes that its best defense is openness will we see transparency as a good in itself and not just a weapon to expose the bad," he said.

NPR, Fox News and objectivity: The other story that dominated the future-of-news discussion (and the news discussion in general) was NPR's firing last week of news analyst Juan Williams for comments about Muslims he made on Fox News. Conversation about the firing took off late last week and didn't slow down until about Wednesday this week. NPR kept finding it tougher to defend the firing as the criticism piled up, and by the weekend, NPR CEO Vivian Schiller had apologized for how she handled the firing (but not for the firing itself), Armour Over The Counter. NPR got a bomb threat over the incident, Armour pictures, and even PBS, which has had nothing whatsoever to do with Williams, was deluged with angry emailers.

Conversation centered on two issues: First, and more immediately, why Williams was fired and whether he should have been. Where can i buy Armour online, Longtime reporter James Naughton and The Awl's Abe Sauer thought Williams should have been fired years ago because he appeared on Fox, where he's only used as a prop in Fox's efforts to incite faux-news propaganda. NYU professor Jay Rosen put it more carefully, saying that given NPR's ironclad commitment to the objective view from nowhere, "there was no way he could abide by NPR’s rules — which insist on viewlessness as a guarantor of trust — and appear on Fox, where the clash of views is basic to what the network does to generate audience" — not to mention that that viewlessness renders the entire position of "news analyst" problematic. Armour Over The Counter, Along with Rosen, Time media critic James Poniewozik and Lehigh j-prof Jeremy Littau advocated for greater transparency as a way to prevent needless scandals like these. Former NPR host Farai Chideya emphasized a different angle, asserting that Williams was kept on for years as his relationship with NPR eroded because he's a black man, Armour reviews. Said Chideya, who's African-American herself: "Williams' presence on air was a fig-leaf for much broader and deeper diversity problems at the network."

The other issue was both broader and more politically driven: Should NPR lose its public funding. Republican Sen. Jim DeMint said he would introduce a bill to that effect, and conservatives echoed his call for defunding (though NPR gets only 1 to 2 percent of its budget from public funding — and even that's from competitive federal grants). Politico noted how difficult it would be to actually take NPR's public funding, and a poll indicated that Americans are split on the issue straight down party lines, Armour Over The Counter.

Those calling for the cut got some support, Fast shipping Armour, however indirect, from a couple of people in the media world: Slate's Jack Shafer said NPR and public radio stations should wean themselves from public funding so they can stop being tossed around as a political pawn, and New York Sun founding editor Eric Lipsky argued that NPR's subsidies make it harder for private entrepreneurs to raise money for highbrow journalism. There were counter-arguments, too: The Atlantic's James Fallows gave a passionate defense of NPR's value as a news organization, and LSU grad student Matt Schafer made the case for public media in general.

Magazines disappoint on the iPad: Advertising Age collected circulation figures for the first six months of magazines' availability on the iPad and compared it to print circulation, getting decided mixed results, Armour trusted pharmacy reviews. (Science/tech mags did really well; general interest titles, not so much.) The site's Nat Ives concluded that iPad ad rates might drop as result, and that "Magazines' iPad editions won't really get in gear until big publishers and Apple agree on some kind of system for subscription offers."

Former New York Times design director Khoi Vinh gave a stinging critique of those magazines' iPad apps, saying they're at odds with how people actually use the device. " Armour Over The Counter, They’re bloated, user-unfriendly and map to a tired pattern of mass media brands trying vainly to establish beachheads on new platforms without really understanding the platforms at all," he said. In a follow-up, he talked a bit about why their current designs are a "stand-in for true experimentation."

Meanwhile, Where can i cheapest Armour online, news organizations continue to rush to the iPad: The New York Post came out with an iPad app that The Village Voice's Foster Kamer really, really liked, The Oklahoman became another one of the first few newspapers to offer its own iPad subscription outside of Apple's iTunes payment system, PBS launched its own iPad app, and News Corp. is moving forward with plans for a new tabloid created just for tablets.

Two opposite paid-content moves: It was somewhat lost in the WikiLeaks-Williams hoopla, but we got news of three new online paid-content plans for news this week. The biggest change is at the National Journal, Armour price, coupon, a political magazine that's long charged very high prices and catered to Washington policy wonks but relaunched this week as a newsstand-friendly print product and a largely free website that will shoot for 80 updates a day. The Lab's Laura McGann looked at the Journal's new free-pay hybrid web plan, in contrast to its largely paid, niche website previously.

Meanwhile, Politico said it plans to move into exactly the same web territory the Journal is leaving, launching a high-price subscription news service on health care, energy and technology for Washington insiders in addition to its free site and print edition, Armour Over The Counter. And the Associated Press gave more details on its proposed rights clearinghouse for publishers, which will allow them to tag online content and monitor and regulate how it's being used and how they're being paid for it. Is Armour addictive, We also have some more data on an ongoing paid-content experiment — Rupert Murdoch's paywall at The Times of London. Yup, the audience is way down, just like everyone suspected.

Reading roundup: Outside of those two huge stories, it was a relatively quiet week. Armour Over The Counter, Here are a few interesting bits and pieces that emerged:

— The awful last few weeks for the Tribune Co. came to a head last Friday when CEO Randy Michaels resigned, leaving a four-member council to guide the company through bankruptcy. The same day, the company filed a reorganization plan that turns it over to its leading creditors. The Chicago Reader's Michael Miner gave a good postmortem for the Michaels era, pointing a finger primarily at the man who hired him, Order Armour from mexican pharmacy, Sam Zell.

— Wired's Fred Vogelstein declared Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon our new (media) overlords. (No indication of whether he, for one, welcomes them.) MediaPost's Joe Marchese mused a bit about where each of those four companies fits in the new media landscape.

— The Atlantic's Michael Hirschorn wrote a thought-provoking expression of a popular recent argument: If the Internet gives all of us our own facts, Armour steet value, how are we supposed to find any common ground for discussion.

— And since I know you're in the mood for scientific-looking formulas, check out Lois Beckett's examination here at the Lab of Philly.com's calculation of online engagement, then take a look at her follow-up post on where revenue fits in.

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November 4th, 2010

Cipro Cost

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Cipro Cost, on Oct. 22, 2010.]

The value of hard news online: Perfect Market, a company that works on monetizing news online, released a study this week detailing the value of this summer's most valuable stories. The study included an interesting finding: The fluffy, celebrity-driven stories that generate so much traffic for news sites are actually less valuable to advertisers than relevant hard news. The key to this finding, purchase Cipro for sale, The New York Times reported, is that news stories that actually affect people are easier to sell contextual advertising around — and that kind of advertising is much more valuable than standard banner ads.

As Advertising Age pointed out, a lot of this goes back to keyword ads and particularly Google AdSense; a lot of, say, mortgage lenders and immigration lawyers are doing keyword advertising, Australia, uk, us, usa, and they want to advertise around subjects that deal with those issues. In other words, stories that actually mean something to readers are likely to mean something to advertisers too, Cipro Cost.

But the relationship isn't quite that simple, said GigaOM's Mathew Ingram. Advertisers don't just want to advertise on pages about serious subjects; they want to advertise on pages about serious subjects that are getting loads of pageviews — and you get those pageviews by also writing about the Lindsey Lohans of the world. SEOmoz' s Rand Fishkin had a few lingering questions about the study, and the Lab's Megan Garber took the study as a cue that news organizations need to work harder on "making their ads contextually relevant to their content."

The Times Co.'s paywall surprise: The New York Times Co. released its third-quarter earnings statement (your summary: print down, digital up, overall meh), and the Awl's Choire Sicha put together a telling graph that shows how The Times has scaled down its operation while maintaining at least a small profit, Cipro natural. Sicha also noted that digital advertising now accounts for a third of The Times' total revenue, which has to be an relatively encouraging sign for the company.

Times Co. Cipro Cost, CEO Janet Robinson talked briefly and vaguely about the company's paid-content efforts, led by The Times' own planned paywall and the Boston Globe's two-site plan. But what made a few headlines was the fact that the company's small Massachusetts paper, The Telegram & Gazette, actually saw its number of unique visitors increase after installing a paywall in August. Cheap Cipro, Peter Kafka of All Things Digital checked the numbers out with comScore and offered a few possible reasons for the bump (maybe a few Google- or Facebook-friendly stories, or a seasonal traffic boost).

The Next Web's Chad Catacchio pushed back against Kafka's amazement, pointing out that the website remains free to print subscribers, which, he says, probably make up the majority of the people interested in visiting the site of a fairly small community paper like that one. Catacchio called the Times Co.'s touting of the paper's numbers a tactic to counter the skepticism about The Times' paywall, order Cipro no prescription, when in reality, he said, "this is completely apples and oranges."

WikiLeaks vs. the world: The international leaking organization WikiLeaks has kept a relatively low profile since it dropped 92,000 pages of documents on the war in Afghanistan in July, but Spencer Ackerman wrote at Wired that WikiLeaks is getting ready to release as many as 400,000 pages of documents on the Iraq War as soon as next week, as two other Wired reporters looked at WikiLeaks' internal conflict and the ongoing "scheduled maintenance" of its site, Cipro Cost. WikiLeaks editor Julian Assange responded by blasting Wired via Twitter, and Wired issued a defense.

One of the primary criticisms of WikiLeaks after their Afghanistan release was that they were putting the lives of American informants and intelligence agents at risk by revealing some of their identities. Cipro online cod, But late last week, we found out about an August memo by Defense Secretary Robert Gates acknowledging that no U.S. intelligence sources were compromised by the July leak. Salon's Glenn Greenwald documented Cipro Cost, the numerous times government officials and others in the media asserted exactly the opposite.

Greenwald asserted that part of the reason for the government's rhetoric is its fear of damage that could be caused by WikiLeaks future leaks, and sure enough, it's already urging news organizations not to publish information from WikiLeaks' Iraq documents. At The Link, Nadim Kobeissi wrote an interesting account of the battle over WikiLeaks so far, Cipro alternatives, characterizing it as a struggle between the free, open ethos of the web and the highly structured, hierarchical nature of the U.S. government. "No nation has ever fought, or even imagined, a war with a nation that has no homeland and a people with no identity, Cipro from canadian pharmacy, " Kobeissi said.

Third-party plans at Yahoo and snafus at Facebook: An interesting development that didn't get a whole lot of press this week: The Wall Street Journal reported that Yahoo will soon launch Y Connect, a tool like Facebook Connect that will put widgets on sites across the web that allow users to log in and interact at the sites under their Yahoo ID. PaidContent's Joseph Tarkatoff noted that Y Connect's success will depend largely on who it can convince to participate (The Huffington Post is in so far), Cipro Cost.

The Wall Street Journal also reported another story about social media and third parties this week that got quite a bit more play, when it revealed that many of the most popular apps on Facebook are transmitting identifying information to advertisers without users' knowledge. Search Engine Land's Barry Schwartz found the juxtaposition of the two stories funny, and while the tech world was abuzz, Michael Arrington of TechCrunch gave the report the "Move on, real brand Cipro online, nothing to see here" treatment.

An unplanned jump from NPR to Fox News: Another week, another prominent member of the news media fired for foot-in-mouth remarks: NPR commentator Juan Williams lost his job for saying on Fox News' The O'Reilly Factor that he gets nervous when he sees Muslims in traditional dress on airplanes. Within 24 hours of being fired, though, Williams had a full-time gig (and a pay raise) at Fox News. Williams has gotten into hot water with NPR Cipro Cost, before for statements he's made on Fox News, which led some to conclude that this was more about Fox News than that particular statement.

NPR CEO Vivian Schiller explained why Williams was booted (he engaged in non-fact-based punditry and expressed views he wouldn't express on NPR as a journalist, she said), but, of course, not everybody was pleased with the decision or its rationale. (Here's Williams' own take on the situation.) Much of the discussion was pretty politically oriented — New York's Daily Intel has a pretty good summary of the various perspectives — but there were several who weren't pleased with the firing along media-related lines, Cipro pharmacy. The American Journalism Review's Rem Rieder said the move came too hastily, and The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg said he doesn't like the trend of news organizations firing reporters over statements about Muslims or Jews.

Glenn Greenwald of Salon didn't care for this firing in particular, but said if you cheered the firings of those other reporters, you can't rail about this one for consistency's sake. The Columbia Journalism Review's Joel Meares, meanwhile, argued that Williams' firing sent the wrong message, especially for a news outlet known for taking advantage of controversial moments as opportunities for civil discourse: "Say something off-key, and you’re silenced, Cipro Cost. Expect that from CNN, After Cipro, but we thought better of NPR."

Newsweek and The Daily Beast's deal dies: With rumors swirling of a merger between Newsweek and the online aggregator The Daily Beast, we were all ready to start calling the magazine TinaWeek or NewsBeast last weekend. But by Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal had reported that the talks were off. There were some conflicting reports about who broke off talks; the Beast's Tina Brown said she got cold feet, but new Newsweek owner Sidney Harman said both parties backed off. (Turns out it was former GE exec Jack Welch, an adviser on the negotiations, where to buy Cipro, who threw ice water on the thing.)

Business Insider's Joe Pompeo gave word of continued staff shuffling, and Zeke Turner of The New York Observer reported on the frosty relations between Newsweek staffers and Harman, as well as their disappointment that Brown wouldn't be coming to "just blow it up." The Wrap's Dylan Stableford wondered what Newsweek's succession plan for the 92-year-old Harman is. Cipro Cost, If Newsweek does fall apart, Slate media critic Jack Shafer said, that wouldn't be good news for its chief competitor, Time.

Reading roundup: We've got several larger stories that would have been standalone items in a less busy week, so we'll start with those.

— As Gawker first reported, What is Cipro, The Huffington Post folded its year-old Investigative Fund into the Center for Public Integrity, the deans of nonprofit investigative journalism. As Gawker pointed out, a lot of the fund's problems likely stemmed from the fact that it was having trouble getting its nonprofit tax status because it was only able to supply stories to its own site. The Knight Foundation, which recently gave the fund $1.7 million, handed it an additional $250,000 to complete the merger, canada, mexico, india.

— Nielsen released a study on iPad users with several interesting findings, including that books, TV and movies are popular content on it compared with the iPhone and nearly half of tablet owners describe themselves as early adopters. Also in tablet news, News Corp. delayed its iPad news aggregation app plans, and publishers might be worried about selling ads on a smaller set of tablet screens than the iPad, Cipro Cost.

— From the so-depressing-but-we-can't-stop-watching department: The Tribune Co.'s woes continue to snowball, with innovation chief Lee Abrams resigning late last week and CEO Randy Michaels set to resign late this week. Abrams issued a lengthy self-defense, and Chicago Tribune columnist John Kass defended his paper, too.

— J-prof Jay Rosen proposed what he calls the "100 percent solution"  — innovating in news trying to cover 100 percent of something. Paul Bradshaw liked the idea and began to build on it. Cipro Cost, — It's not a new debate at all, but it's an interesting rehashing nonetheless: Jeff Novich called Ground Report and citizen journalism useless tools that can never do what real journalism does. Megan Taylor and Spot.Us' David Cohn disagreed, strongly.

— Finally, former Los Angeles Times intern Michelle Minkoff wrote a great post about the data projects she worked on there and need to collaborate around news as data. As TBD's Steve Buttry wrote"Each of the 5 W’s could just as easily be a field in a database. ... Databases give news content more lasting value, by providing context and relationships.".

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