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April 25th, 2013

This Week in Review: Jonah Lehrer’s lucrative apology, and two differing hyperlocal strategies

December 23rd, 2011

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Order Lipitor, [This review was originally posted on Sept. 23, 2011, at the Nieman Journalism Lab.]

Facebook ramps its sharing up even further: We had been hearing all week about a big announcement Facebook would be making this Thursday at its annual conference — about how it would mark the social network's rebirth and leave the competition in the dust. So here's what we got (in a handy roundup from Gizmodo): A Twitter-like mini-feed called Ticker (meant to make the News Feed look more like "your own personal newspaper"), apps on Facebook's Open Graph, sharing music and games through integration with services like the music player Spotify, No prescription Lipitor online, and Timeline, essentially a one-page Facebook life story.

It's pretty clear what Facebook's goal is with all of this: Put charitably, as Wired's Mike Isaac did, it's "allowing for the Facebook page to be a sort of one-stop shop, scooping up all of your activities and displaying them in one grand, blue and white frame." Put more skeptically, as the New Yorker's Nicholas Thompson did, is Lipitor addictive, Facebook wants to eat up a large chunk of the Internet, which has some real consequences: "The more our online lives take place on Facebook, the more we depend on the choices of the people who run the company—what they think about privacy, how they think we should be able to organize our friends, what they tell advertisers (and governments) about what we do and what we buy."

Tom Foremski of Silicon Valley Watcher made the point a different way, arguing that Facebook is trying to combat the natural slowdown in how much we're willing to share online by making it more frictionless and ubiquitous. Lipitor alternatives, Reactions were similar in displaying two sides of the same coin: The ability to pull together a lot of old social information into a single Timeline was either "something a lot of users wanted without much of a voice asking for it" (ZDNet's Rachel King) or a fix to "a problem absolutely no one was clamoring about" (Gawker's Adrian Chen). We'll get more of a sense of which side is more accurate over the next several months, Order Lipitor.

Facebook meets news apps: Another one of the changes announced by Facebook on Thursday was the addition of several new Facebook-based news apps, the first of which was the Wall Street Journal's WSJ Social, unveiled on Tuesday. (Others, like the Washington Post's and Yahoo's, were announced on Thursday.) As the Lab's Megan Garber explained, the app allows each user to edit their own stream of Journal material, is Lipitor safe, and to follow and rank others based on their editing.

As Forbes' Jeff Bercovici pointed out, the app seems to serve both the Journal's and Facebook's interests quite nicely: It keeps people's news consumption and interaction within Facebook, but allows the Journal to sell its own ads within the app and keep the money. (Facebook gets everything for the ads outside the app.)

There were questions about the app — Adweek's Dylan Byers wondered how fond people would be of an app that curates content from only one source, and GigaOM's Mathew Ingram questioned how well the socially oriented app would work with a hard paywall, Herbal Lipitor, and more generally, whether it's wise for news organizations to leave so much of their user interaction inside Facebook.

AOL's struggles and the future of online content: The AOL/TechCrunch saga Order Lipitor, seems to be (mercifully) winding down this week — the last real drama took place late last week, when one TechCrunch writer, Paul Carr, quit with a scorched-earth post directed at new editor Erick Schonfeld, and Schonfeld disputed his claims. But the bad news continues to roll in for AOL: The sales director for its hyperlocal news project, Patch, left — the second top AOL ad exec to bolt in the past month. Business Insider reported that AOL may lose $30 million on Patch this year. And AOL's prospects as a content-based company in general don't look rosy, as paidContent's Robert Andrews pointed out, online Lipitor without a prescription, looking at the declining revenues for AOL Europe once it dropped Internet access from its business model.

AOL execs remain positive in the face of all the bad news: Arianna Huffington said her Huffington Post's merger with AOL has been a boon for both HuffPo and Patch, thanks to the new synergies between the two operations. On the advertising side, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong said he hopes to catch Microsoft and Google in online display ads, a tall task, Order Lipitor.

Outside the company, of course, skeptics still abound. Where can i find Lipitor online, Bloomberg Businessweek's Peter Burrows declared AOL and its fellow web portal Yahoo dead companies walking, saying they "have tried to live by Old Media rules while masquerading as New Media powerhouses." And at Adweek, Michael Wolff pointed to AOL and Yahoo's struggles as evidence that online content can't sustain a business model. The only content that can still do that, he said, is TV or video: "What still works, what advertisers and audiences still seek, is superexpensive content."

Netflix's big split: It wasn't related to journalism per se, Lipitor pictures, but the big story at the intersection of media and tech this week was the announcement of Netflix's split into two businesses — one for streaming video online, and a new one, Qwikster, to continue its DVD-by-mail service. The change was welcomed by approximately no one: Not users or investors, as the New York Times reported, Buy generic Lipitor, not analysts like Business Insider's Henry Blodget (who said it's bad for customers) and paidContent's Robert Andrews (who said it's bad for business), and not the Oatmeal's Matthew Inman, who summed up the head-scratching nature of the move as well as anyone. Order Lipitor, Of course, Netflix had to have a reason for doing this, and there were several popular guesses, rounded up well by Tim Carmody of Wired. As Carmody explained, there are two main theories: 1) Separating DVDs and streaming makes it easier and cheaper for Netflix to negotiate rights with Hollywood (best articulated by venture capitalist Bill Gurley), and 2) Netflix wants to let its DVD business die in peace, without taking streaming down with it (argued in two posts by tech writer Dan Frommer). Along the lines of the latter theory, rx free Lipitor, GigaOM's Mathew Ingram likened Netflix's situation to the news business and wondered who would be the first newspaper company to spin off its print product from its digital side.

The News Corp. scandal and a press freedom threat: It's been a couple of months since News Corp.'s phone-hacking scandal was making big headlines, but the problems stemming from it continue to spread week by week. Deadline New York's David Lieberman looked at some of the financial signs indicating that the fallout may not be isolated to News Corp.'s British newspaper division, Order Lipitor. This week, a couple of aspects of the scandal heated up as another wound down: News Corp. Lipitor over the counter, is expected to settle its highest-profile hacking case (with the family of a murdered 12-year-old girl) for $4.7 million, while the U.S. Justice Department reportedly began asking the company for information in its investigation into bribery charges, and new allegations of hacking into a former government official's voicemail emerged.

Meanwhile, apart from News Corp., the story briefly sparked a press freedom fight when Scotland Yard invoked an espionage law to threaten the Guardian to give up its anonymous sources on one of the hacking cases. Order Lipitor, Journalists across Britain, including some from competitors like the Daily Mail, rose up to defend the Guardian, and within a few days, police dropped their threat. The backlash was strong enough that members of Parliament will question one of Scotland Yard's top officials over the plan, about Lipitor.

Reading roundup: Tons of other little things going on this week. Here's a quick tour:

— Some interesting media fallout from WikiLeaks' recent diplomatic cable release: Al Jazeera's news director resigned after the cables showed that he had modified the network's Iraq war coverage based on pressure from the U.S. This, of course, raised questions about Al Jazeera's independence and credibility. Elsewhere, British journalism thinker Charlie Beckett talked about what WikiLeaks can tell us about where news is headed, Order Lipitor. Buy Lipitor without a prescription, — Though its changes were trumped by Facebook, Google+ unveiled several new features and announced that it's open to everyone. J-prof Dan Reimold declared the new social network dead, but Wired's Tim Carmody explained how Google+'s changes are meant to change that.

— The Washington Post's Monica Hesse wrote a thought-provoking piece on journalists' tendency to obsess with things happening on social networks, leading to insights that ... aren't that insightful. If you're interested in using social media in a way that's actually worthwhile, fast shipping Lipitor, Poynter's Mallary Jean Tenore has a good guide to ways journalists can use Twitter before, during, and after reporting a story.

— At Silicon Valley Watcher, Matthew Buckland did a fascinating Q&A with Wired editor Chris Anderson — the first half on the decline of the open web, and the second on what journalism is now. Lipitor steet value, — This week's most interesting piece of media-related research comes from NYU's Tim Libert, who looked at thousands of comments about the online hacking group LulzSec, finding that the discourse indicated that the group is "in the position of villain rather than the champion of the people’s rights, as they would presumably like to be seen."

— Finally, the AP's Jonathan Stray wrote a stirring piece on what it would look like if we merged journalism with "maker culture," concluding, "This is a theory of civic participation based on empowering the people who like to get their hands dirty tinkering with the future. Maybe that’s every bit as important as informing voters or getting politicians fired.".

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August 13th, 2011

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[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Buy Retin A No Prescription, on Aug. 12, 2011.]

Murdoch passes Wall Street's test: The fallout from News Corp.'s phone hacking scandal continued to spread this week, with the reported arrest of another former News of the World editor and the report that the ostensibly fired News Corp. British chief, Rebekah Brooks, Retin A alternatives, is still on the company payroll.

Three weeks after testifying before Parliament, Rupert Murdoch faced Wall Street analysts this week in a conference call, telling them that he's not going anywhere and that the scandal hasn't done any material damage to the company outside of News of the World. Purchase Retin A, All Things Digital's Peter Kafka said Wall Street really doesn't care about the hacking, and Murdoch didn't say much about the few questions he did get on it.

Murdoch also had to meet with News Corp.'s board, but as the New York Times' Jeremy Peters reported, the board's officially independent members include numerous people who have deep personal ties to Murdoch, Buy Retin A No Prescription. Perhaps more troubling was a different connection among one of the board members: According to Time's Massimo Calabresi, one of them is "best friends" with the district attorney leading the U.S. investigation into the company.

The Times' David Carr uncovered more hints at News Corp.'s enormous political influence here in the States, Retin A pics, detailing cases of swift approval of a merger by a Justice Department unit led by a future News Corp. executive, as well as a suspiciously dropped federal criminal case. "The company’s size and might give it a soft, less obvious power that it has been able to project to remarkable effect, Buy Retin A without prescription, " Carr concluded. Buy Retin A No Prescription, At Adweek, Murdoch biographer Michael Wolff went further, reporting that the Justice Department is considering investigating News Corp. on racketeering charges, though Forbes' Jeff Bercovici doubted that would happen. For a bit more info on the situation, here's a good Q&A with Nick Davies, the Guardian reporter who's been all over the story, order Retin A no prescription.

AOL's slap from investors: This week hasn't been a good one for AOL: After it reported a quarterly loss on Tuesday, its stock dropped by about a quarter by the end of the day. All Things Digital's Peter Kafka gave a quick explainer of why investors are so down on AOL: What little money they're making isn't coming from the all-important display advertising business. Mathew Ingram of GigaOM added more depth to that analysis, arguing that investors are doubting AOL's assurances that its two big gambles — Patch and the acquisition of the Huffington Post — will pay off, Buy Retin A No Prescription.

According to AOL CEO Tim Armstrong (paraphrased by Business Insider), Retin A price, coupon, the reason for those problems is that AOL's advertising side hasn't scaled well enough. Peter Kafka explained that AOL's advertising (especially display) is indeed up, though much of that can be attributed to the HuffPo and TechCrunch acquisitions. Forbes' Jeff Bercovici said AOL's public image problem has even damaged the previously successful HuffPo, quoting an analyst who called AOL a "dead brand." Wired's Tim Carmody decided to unite our two big stories this week and suggested that AOL would be a perfect fit for a purchase by News Corp.

Meanwhile's AOL's local-news initiative, Retin A samples, Patch, launched a Groupon-esque daily deal service, and Iowa grad student Robert Gutsche Jr.questioned Patch's standards for separating journalism and advertising — and got the runaround from Patch when he asked them about it. AOL's new daily tablet magazine, Editions, Buying Retin A online over the counter,  also drew some criticism, with Fast Company's Austin Carr perturbed that it's not AOL-y enough.

A news org gets into tablets Buy Retin A No Prescription, : We've already seen numerous challengers to the iPad's early stranglehold on the tablet marketplace, but the Tribune Co. might be the first news company to try one out. CNN's Mark Milian reported that the newspaper chain is working on an Android-based tablet, which it's planning on offering it for free or very cheap to people who sign up for extended newspaper subscriptions. It's already missed a mid-August deadline for testing the tablet out, purchase Retin A online.

Media pundits didn't think much of the Tribune's idea. Wired's Tim Carmody urged the Tribune (and media companies in general) to quit developing tablets, arguing that it's way too hard to do if you're a major development company, let alone a news organization. "If major publishers are seriously prepared to blow up their primary revenue stream — print advertising — and slap together a giveaway tablet in order to save money on ink, God help them," he wrote, Buy Retin A No Prescription.

Others echoed Carmody's arguments: PaidContent's Tom Crazit called the project "a colossal waste of money for a company trying to emerge from bankruptcy." Chris Velazco of TechCrunch said the cheap-tablet model (also being talked about by Philadelphia Newspapers) isn't viable. Gizmodo's Brent Rose was less restrained: "WHY??" Morris Communications' Steve Yelvington was a little kinder to the Tribune, saying the numbers might add up, Kjøpe Retin A på nett, köpa Retin A online, but the devil's in the details.

The Times gets experimental: The New York Times has frequently made strong pushes into news innovation over the past several years, and this week it started another one, launching a new public test kitchen for projects in development. The Lab's Megan Garber explained what the site, beta620, Retin A for sale, is all about, but GigaOM's Mathew Ingram, while applauding the effort, expressed some doubt about whether the Times is really capable of developing a startup's mindset. Buy Retin A No Prescription, Tim Carmody of Wired, on the other hand, said the startup analogy isn't the right one for the Times. Retin A online cod, With these projects, he said, "The New York Times has become an openly experimental public institution. It’s less a cathedral consecrated to its own past than a free museum where patrons are invited to touch and transform everything they see." Poynter's Jeff Sonderman had some suggestions for next steps for the Times to take with beta620: experimenting with design, getting away from the long narrative article, and rethinking comments, Retin A trusted pharmacy reviews.

The real-name debate: One long-simmering debate I want to briefly catch you up on: Google+ has decided to take the Facebook route of disallowing pseudonyms, adjusting but reaffirming its policy in the face of online criticism late last month and again on Thursday. The outcry continued, voiced most prominently late last week by social media researcher danah boyd, Order Retin A from mexican pharmacy, who asserted that "'real names' policies aren’t empowering; they’re an authoritarian assertion of power over vulnerable people."

Liz Gannes of All Things Digital said she understands Google's motivations for enforcing real names and unifying everything under its umbrella within the same identity, but the idea of doing the latter is awkward at best and frightening at worst. The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal, meanwhile, announced he's changed his mind against real-name policies, arguing that requiring real names online is a radical departure from the relationship between speech and identity in the offline world, Buy Retin A No Prescription.

Reading roundup: A few other things to keep an eye on this week:

— Amazon released a version of its Kindle app for browsers, called the Kindle Cloud Reader. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram said the browser-based e-book app (which bypasses Apple's restrictions) could be a roadmap for the future of the web, but Wired's Tim Carmody said it still doesn't get the web, Retin A without prescription.

— Google announced it's making its hand-chosen Editors' Picks a standing feature on Google News. The Lab's Megan Garber explained what Google's doing with it. Buy Retin A No Prescription, Meanwhile, James Gleick at The New York Review of Books offered a thoughtful piece on Google's domination of our online lives.

— Adweek explained an underrated obstacle to innovation and progress in news organizations' online efforts: the intractable CMS.

— Steve Buttry, now with the Journal Register Co., gave his lessons from TBD's demise on the Washington local news site's first birthday. It's short but solid. Enjoy.

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July 9th, 2011

Glucophage Over The Counter

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Glucophage Over The Counter, on June 17, 2011.]

The Guardian's digital leap: The Guardian has long been one of the top newspapers on the web, but this week, the British paper announced a major step in its development as a digital news organization with a transition to a "digital first" operation. So what exactly does that mean. Essentially, that the Guardian will pour more of its resources (especially financial) into its digital operation in an effort to double its digital revenues within the next five years.

Like at many papers, the Guardian's print side is sagging severely, Glucophage gel, ointment, cream, pill, spray, continuous-release, extended-release. According to execs, the paper's parent company could run out of cash in three to five years if things don't change. As the Press Gazette's Dominic Ponsford noted, this move indicates that the Guardian doesn't believe that print decline can be stopped or reversed, Glucophage Over The Counter.

But at the same time, Guardian execs told paidContent they're not abandoning print entirely, Glucophage pharmacy, just reconfiguring it for the digital era. That includes transforming the daily paper into a more analysis-heavy edition that's meant to read in the evening. As Yahoo's Joe Pompeo reported, the transformation also involves forming a newsroom for a new U.S.-based site.

The Guardian's executives believe this digital transition will be inevitable for newspapers: "All newspapers will ultimately exit print, but we’re putting no timeframe on that, herbal Glucophage," said Guardian Media Group CEO Andrew Miller. Ponsford said Glucophage Over The Counter, that while this is a watershed moment for the Guardian, it doesn't necessarily mean the end of print for Britain's national press. And NYU j-prof Jay Rosen saw the Guardian as staking out the open approach to the web, alongside the Times' gated approach and the New York Times' metered one.

Strengthening local journalism: The FCC released its report on the state of local journalism late last week, Buy cheap Glucophage no rx, and some of the interesting conversation surrounding it bled over into this week. Free Press' Josh Stearns responded with a thoughtful post about journalism and institutions in which he made the point that the report predominantly addresses structural factors, when journalism's cultural climate may be more damaging in its ability to keep institutions in check. "The contradiction at the center of the recent FCC report – that citizens have more tools than ever to be watchdogs, but have less power than ever to hold institutions accountable – highlights one of the most troubling aspects of the shifting journalism landscape," Stearns wrote.

The study didn't offer much in the way of solutions (especially government-based ones), doses Glucophage work, largely leaving news organizations to figure out how to combat these problems on their own. Mathew Ingram of GigaOM saw that message as a worthwhile one,  while Jessica Clark of PBS MediaShift viewed that as a weakness, Glucophage Over The Counter. Ars Technica's Matthew Lasar focused on a different aspect of the report: The idea that the Internet has "hamsterized" journalism, forcing reporters to focus on smaller, more time-sensitive stories, Order Glucophage from United States pharmacy, rather than larger, more significant ones.

Finding space for articles and stories: Another discussion carried over from the past couple of weeks: CUNY j-prof Jeff Jarvis' post late last month describing the article as "luxury or byproduct" of the journalistic process created a bit of a stir when he published it, and that discussion was renewed this week when French media consultant Frederic Filloux argued against Jarvis' point, saying instead that articles have become more essential in the age of the tweet: "Articles are more necessary than ever to understand and to correct excesses and mistakes resulting from an ever expanding flurry of instant coverage," he said, Glucophage description.

Jarvis replied that he's not intending to devalue the article, but to elevate its value to something worthy of serious, focused effort. "Too many articles passing themselves off as professional journalism are crap and I say we can’t afford to do that anymore. Glucophage Over The Counter, I say we should treat articles with veneration as a luxury," he said. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram tried to reconcile those two positions in a can't-we-all-just-get-along post. Glucophage blogs, TBD's Steve Buttry added to the discussion with a distinction between "story" and "article." An article is a set of facts usually oriented around the 5 W's, Buttry said, but a story has narrative arc and is built around plot, character, and setting. One can live on without the other, Glucophage class, he argued. "Perhaps the news article and the text narrative will survive in some form in journalism. But if they fade into journalism’s history, storytelling and journalism can still survive and thrive."

Online community and local news: Within the Nieman Foundation's Justice League for journalism, there were a couple of cool collections of articles published this week that you'll probably want to take a look at. Purchase Glucophage for sale, The first comes from Nieman Reports, whose summer issue, released this week, focuses on journalism's role in fostering connections and community online. The issue contains dozens of bright pieces on the subject, including Public Radio International's Michael Skoler on community as a business model, former NPR ombudsman Alicia Shepard on online comments, Emily Olson of the Register-Citizen on the newsroom cafe, and Kentucky j-prof Al Cross on rural community journalism, Glucophage Over The Counter.

The other set of posts were here at the Lab, based on an FCC study on the decline of web-based local news, Glucophage recreational. George Washington j-prof Nikki Usher gave a fine summary of the study, emphasizing the small role that local news, whether affiliated with traditional news orgs or not, has in the U.S. Glucophage australia, uk, us, usa, online ecosystem. Before you get too depressed about the study, though, you should check out Lab editor Joshua Benton's cautionary notes about the findings. Benton also broke the data out by community Glucophage Over The Counter, , giving us some fascinating geographical data to play with.

Reading roundup: After last week's Applepalooza, it was a relatively slow week this week, effects of Glucophage. Here are a few more of the highlights:

— In our now-weekly look at the world of AOL, the Los Angeles Times' James Rainey wrote a feature on Patch taking it to task for falling short of its grand local-media aspirations, Buying Glucophage online over the counter, and GigaOM's Mathew Ingram said AOL's profitability plans for Patch are wishful thinking. Street Fight's Alex Salkever, meanwhile, said Patch's main problem is bad pay.

— The Journal Register Co.'s John Paton posted the text and slides from a talk detailing his newspaper company's "Digital First" transformation, with plenty of advice for other local newspapers, Glucophage online cod.

— Several useful sets of tips for journalists: NPR's Matt Thompson on ways journalists can take advantage of evolving content management systems, Poynter's Jeff Sonderman on Facebook news publishing from a newly Facebook-only news org, and Amy Gahran's basic toolkit for online journalistic engagement.

— Pew released a study on online social networks and American life, and it's sure to have a boatload of interesting data for researchers, news orgs, or anyone else interested in social media.

— Finally, here at the Lab, Brain Pickings editor Maria Popova wrote a smart post looking at Twitter and the rise of curation as a form of authorship. It's well worth a read.

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June 1st, 2011

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[This week's review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Purchase Bactrim, on May 20, 2011.]

Twitter on the brain: Last week, New York Times executive editor Bill Keller got a rise out of a lot of folks online with one of the shortest of his 21 career tweets: "#TwitterMakesYouStupid. Discuss." Keller revealed the purpose of his social experiment this week in a column arguing, in so many words, that Twitter may be dulling your humanity, and probably making you stupid, too. Here's the money quote: "my inner worrywart wonders whether the new technologies overtaking us may be eroding characteristics that are essentially human: our ability to reflect, real brand Bactrim online, our pursuit of meaning, genuine empathy, a sense of community connected by something deeper than snark or political affinity."

This, as you might imagine, did not go over particularly well online. Bactrim used for, There were a couple strains of reaction: Business Insider's Henry Blodget and All Twitter's Lauren Dugan argued that Twitter may indeed be changing us, but for the good, by helping make previously impossible connections.

Alexia Tsotsis of TechCrunch and Mike Masnick of Techdirt countered Keller by saying that while Twitter isn't built for deep conversations, it is quite good at providing an entry point for such discussion: "What you see publicly posted on Twitter and Facebook is just the tip of the conversation iceberg," Tsotsis said. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram, meanwhile, defended Twitter's true social nature, and sociologist Zeynep Tufekci gave a fantastic breakdown of what Twitter does and doesn't do culturally and socially, Purchase Bactrim.

Two of the most eloquent responses were provided by Nick Bilton, Bactrim brand name, one of Keller's own employees, and by Gizmodo's Mat Honan. Bilton pointed out that our brains have shown a remarkable ability to adapt quickly to new technologies without sacrificing old capacities. (Be sure to check out Keller's response afterward.)

Honan made a similar argument: Keller, he said, Bactrim schedule, is confusing the medium with the message, and Twitter, like any technology, is what you make it. "If you choose to do superficial things there, you will have superficial experiences. If you use it to communicate with others on a deeper level, you can have more meaningful experiences that make you smarter, Bactrim for sale, build lasting relationships, and generally enhance your life," Honan wrote.

Google gets more local with news Purchase Bactrim, : Google News unveiled a few interesting changes in the past week, starting with the launch of "News near you." Google has sorted news by location for a while now, but this feature will allow smartphone users to automatically get local news wherever they are. ReadWriteWeb's Dan Rowinski explained why newspapers should be worried about Google moving further onto their local-news turf, and GigaOM's Mathew Ingram criticized newspapers for not coming up with like this themselves. Cheap Bactrim, Poynter's Jeff Sonderman, on the other hand, said Google's feature is still in need of some human curation to go with its algorithmic aggregation. That's an area in which local newspapers can still dominate, he said, but it'll require some technological catchup, as well as a willingness to get over fears about linking to competitors, Bactrim over the counter.

Another change, not publicized by Google News but spotted by the folks at Search Engine Land, was the addition of an option to allow users to filter out blogs and press releases from their results. This raised the question, what exactly does Google consider a blog, Purchase Bactrim. Google told Search Engine Land it relies on a variety of factors to make that decision, especially self-identification. Bactrim coupon, Mathew Ingram ripped this classification, and urged Google to put everything that contains news together in Google News and let readers sort it out.

Fitting linking into news' workflow: A discussion about linking has been simmering on Twitter on and off over the past few weeks, and it began to come together into something useful this week. This round of the conversation started with a post by web thinker and scholar Doc Searls, who wondered why news organizations don't link out more often. Purchase Bactrim, In the comments, the Chicago Tribune's Brian Boyer suggested that one reason is that many newspapers' CMS's and workflows are print-centric, making linking logistically difficult.

CUNY j-prof C.W, purchase Bactrim online no prescription. Anderson responded that the workflow issue isn't much of an excuse, saying, as he put it on Twitter: "At this point 'linking' has been around for twenty years. The fact that this is STILL a workflow issue is almost worse than not caring." This kicked off a sprawling debate on Twitter, aptly chronicled via Storify by Mathew Ingram and Alex Byers. Bactrim wiki, Ingram also wrote a post responding to a few of the themes of resistance of links, particularly the notion that information on the web is inferior to information gained by old-fashioned reporting.

British journalist Kevin Anderson took on the workflow issue in particular, noting how outdated many newspaper CMS's are and challenging them to catch up technologically: "It’s an industrial workflow operating in a digital age, Purchase Bactrim. It’s really only down to ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it’ thinking that allows such a patently inefficient process to persist."

AOL's continued makeover: Another week, another slew of personnel moves at AOL. PaidContent's David Kaplan reported that AOL is hiring "a bunch" of new (paid) editors and shuffling some current employees around after its layoff of hundreds this spring. Overall, Kaplan wrote, doses Bactrim work, this is part of the continued effort to put the Huffington Post's stamp on AOL's editorial products.

One of the AOL entities most affected by the shifts is Seed, which had been a freelance network, but will now fall under AOL's advertising area as a business-to-business product. Purchase Bactrim, Saul Hansell, who was hired in 2009 to run Seed, is moving to HuffPo to edit its new "Big News" features. In a blog post, Bactrim long term, Hansell talked about what this means for HuffPo and for Seed.

Meanwhile, the company is also rolling out AOL Industry, a set of B2B sites covering energy, defense, and government. But wait, no prescription Bactrim online, that's not all: AOL's Patch is launching 33 new sites in states targeting the 2012 election. The hyperlocal news site Street Fight also reported that Patch is urging its editors to post more often, and a group of independent local news sites is banding together to tell the world that they are not Patch, nor anything like it.

Reading roundup: As always, plenty of other stuff get to this week, Purchase Bactrim.

— We mentioned a Pew report's reference to the Drudge Report's influence in last week's review, Where can i find Bactrim online, and this week the New York Times' David Carr marveled at Drudge's continued success without many new-media bells and whistles. Poynter's Julie Moos looked at Drudge's traffic over the years, while the Washington Post disputed Pew's numbers. ZDNet's David Gewirtz had five lessons Drudge can teach the rest of the media world.

— A few paid-content items: A Nielsen survey on what people are willing to pay for various mobile services, Poynter's Rick Edmonds on the New York Times' events marketing for its pay plan, and the Lab's Justin Ellis on paid-content lessons from small newspapers, online buying Bactrim hcl. Purchase Bactrim, — A couple of tablet-related items: Next Issue Media, a joint effort of five publishers to sell magazines on tablets, released its first set of magazines on Google Android-powered Samsung Galaxy. And here at the Lab, Ken Doctor expounded on the iPad as the "missing link" in news' digital evolution.

— Columbia University announced it will launch a local news site this summer focusing on accountability journalism, and the Lab's Megan Garber gave some more details about what Columbia's doing with it.

— The Columbia Journalism Review's Lauren Kirchner had an interesting conversation with Slate's David Plotz about Slate's aggregation efforts, and in response, Reuters' Felix Salmon made the case for valuing aggregation skills in journalists.

— This weekend's think piece is a musing by Maria Bustillos at The Awl on Wikipedia, Marshall McLuhan, communal knowledge-making, and the fate of the expert. Enjoy.

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