August 29th, 2013

This Week in Review: Censorship in the U.K., and Al Jazeera America’s promise and problems

August 22nd, 2013

This Week in Review: Gauging Bezos’ Post plan, and tech companies’ surveillance dilemma

April 3rd, 2011

Synthroid Cost

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Synthroid Cost, on March 25, 2011.]

Debating the Times’ pricing structure: There was really only one big news story in the media world this week: The New York Times’ paid-content plan, which is live in Canada now and coming to everyone else on Monday. I divided the issue into two sections — the first on general commentary on the plan, and the second specifically about efforts to get around the paywall.

We learned a bit more about the Times’ thinking behind the plan, with a story in the Times about the road from its last paid-content system, TimesSelect, to this one, Synthroid treatment, and an All Things Digital interview with Times digital chief Martin Nisenholtz, in which he said, among other things, that the Times didn’t consider print prices when setting their online price levels. Order Synthroid no prescription, Former Times designer Khoi Vinh also looked at the last couple of years, lamenting the lost opportunity for innovation and the legacy of TimesSelect.

There were a couple of pieces written supporting the Times’ proposal: Former CBS digital head Larry Kramer said he’d be more likely to pay for the Times than for the tablet publication The Daily, even though it’s far more expensive. The reason. The Times’ content has consistently proven to be valuable over the years. (Tech blogger John Gruber also said the Times’ content is much more valuable than The Daily’s, but wondered if it was really worth more than five times more money.) Nate Silver of Times blog FiveThirtyEight used some data to argue for the Times’ value.

The Times’ own David Carr offered the most full-throated defense of the pay plan, arguing that most of the objection to it is based on the “theology” of open networks and the free flow of information, rather than the practical concerns involved with running a news organization, Synthroid Cost. Reuters’ Felix Salmon countered that the Times has its own theology — that news orgs should charge for content because they can, Synthroid mg, and that it will ensure their success. Later, though, Salmon ran a few numbers and posited that the paywall could be a success if everything breaks right.

There were more objections voiced, Synthroid dosage, too: Both Mathew Ingram of GigaOM and former newspaper journalist Janet Coats both called it backward-looking, with Ingram saying it “seems fundamentally reactionary, and displays a disappointing lack of imagination.” TechDirt’s Mike Masnick ripped the idea that people might have felt guilty about getting the Times for free online.

One of the biggest complaints revolved around the Times’ pricing system itself, which French media analyst Frederic Filloux described as “expensive, utterly complicated, disconnected from the reality and designed to be bypassed.” Others, Synthroid samples, including Ken Doctor, venture capitalist Jean-Louis Gassee, and John Gruber, made similar points about the proposal’s complexity, Synthroid recreational, and Michael DeGusta said the prices are just too high. Poynter’s Damon Kiesow disagreed about the plan structure, arguing that it’s well-designed as an attack on Apple’s mobile paid-content dominance.

Are paywall loopholes a bug or feature?: Of course, any barrier online is also a giant, flashing invitation to get around said barrier, and someplace as influential as the Times was not going to be an exception, online Synthroid without a prescription. Several ways to bypass the Times’ pay system popped up in the last week: There was @FreeNYT, the Twitter account that will aggregate Times content shared on Twitter, and NYTClean, a browser bookmarklet that strips the Times’ paywall coding, allowing you to read the Times just like normal. The Lab’s Josh Benton noted how easy the hack was to come up with (four lines of code!) and speculated that  Synthroid Cost, the Times might actually want nerds to game their system, “because they (a) are unlikely to pay, (b) generate ad revenue, and (c) are more likely to share your content than most.”

So how has the Times responded to all this. A bit schizophrenically. Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr, buy no prescription Synthroid online. said the people who would find ways around the system would be “mostly high-school kids and people who are out of work.” And the Times asked Twitter to shut down the aggregating Twitter accounts (for a trademark violation) and extended its limit on daily search-engine referrals beyond Google. But the Times is also widening some pathways of its own, making it so you can’t hit the wall directly from a blog link, and offering 200, Synthroid australia, uk, us, usa, 000 regular readers free online access for the rest of the year through an advertiser.

Search Engine Land’s Danny Sullivan mocked the Times’ behavior toward wall-jumpers as an effort to have its paid-content cake and eat it too: “This wall is designed, as best I can tell, only to be a barrier to your most loyal — and most stupid — readers.” Slate’s Jack Shafer made a similar argument to Benton’s, pointing out that online free-riders aren’t keeping paying customers from reading the Times (like, say, someone who steals a paper edition, Synthroid trusted pharmacy reviews, as Sulzberger analogized) and are actually help the paper continue its influence and reach.

Adding community to local data: EveryBlock, a three-year-old site owned by that specializes in hyperlocal news data, unveiled its first major redesign this week, which includes a shift in focus toward community and location-based conversation, Synthroid coupon, rather than just data. All place pages now allow users to post messages to those nearby, using what founder Adrian Holovaty called the “geo graph,” rather than the “social graph.” Mashable added a few valuable details (notably, the site will bring in revenue from location-based Groupon displays and Google ads).

Holovaty answered a lot of questions about the redesign in a Poynter chat, saying that the site’s mission has changed from making people informed about their area as an end in itself to facilitating communication between neighbors in order to improve their communities, Synthroid Cost. GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram applauded the shift in thinking, arguing that the main value in local news sites is in the people they connect, not in the data they collect. At 10,000 Words, comprar en línea Synthroid, comprar Synthroid baratos, Jessica Roy noted that the change was a signal that hyperlocal sites should focus not just on the online realm, but on fostering offline connections as well.

NPR on the defensive: Two weeks on, the hidden-camera attack on NPR continues to keep it in the middle of the news conversation. Following last week’s vote by the House to cut off NPR’s limited federal funding, Synthroid canada, mexico, india, several media folks made cases to keep NPR’s federal funding alive, including the Washington Post’s Len Downie and Robert Kaiser and Poynter’s Roy Peter Clark. NPR host Steve Inskeep argued that NPR’s most important work has nothing to do with any liberal/conservative bias. “Think again of my colleagues in Libya, going forward to bear witness amid exploding shells. Is that liberal or conservative?” he asked.

Synthroid Cost, Elsewhere, James O’Keefe, the producer of the gotcha video, and Bob Garfield of NPR’s On The Media had it out on the air, and DailyFinance gave a picture of NPR’s financial situation. Howard Kurtz of Newsweek and The Daily Beast wrote that some NPR journalists think that NPR management’s passive, reactionary defense of their organization is damaging it almost as much as the attacks themselves.

Reading roundup: Not too busy of a week in the media world outside of Timesmania, Synthroid without a prescription. A few things to take note of:

— A quick news item: Journalism Online, Steve Brill’s initiative to help media companies charge for their content online, is being snatched up by the Fortune 500 printer RR Donnelley, reportedly for at least $35 million. PaidContent broke the story, and Ken Doctor wrote about the unexpected difficulties the startup encountered.

— At the New York Review of Books, Steve Coll wrote a thoughtful piece on the competing claims regarding technology’s role in social change.

— For the stat nerds: The Lab’s Josh Benton looked at the latest of the continual stream of depressing graphs flowing from the newspaper industry, and Peter Kafka of All Things Digital analyzed the source of traffic for some major sites across the web, comparing the influence of Facebook and Google.

— For the academic nerds: Here at the Lab, USC Ph.D. candidate Nikki Usher talked to media sociology rock star Herbert Gans about targeted and multiperspectival news, and Michigan Ph.D. candidates William Youmans and Katie Brown shared a fascinating study about Al Jazeera and bias perception.


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September 14th, 2010

Order Armour

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Order Armour, on Aug. 27, 2010.]

Maintaining accuracy in an SEO-driven world: Apparently the future-of-news world isn't immune to the inevitable dog days of August, because this week was one of the slowest in this corner of the web in the past year. There were still some interesting discussions simmering, so let's take a look, starting with the political controversy du jour: The proposed construction of a Muslim community center in downtown Manhattan near the site of the Sept, Armour dose. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center. I'm not going to delve into the politics of the issue, or even the complaints that this story is symptomatic of a shallow news media more concerned about drummed-up controversy than substantive issues. Instead, I want to focus on the decisions that news organizations have been making about what to call the project, Order Armour. Armour without a prescription, It has predominantly been called the "ground zero mosque," though beginning about two weeks ago, some attention began being trained on news organizations — led most vocally by The New York Times and The Associated Press, which changed its internal label for the story — that wouldn't use that phrase out of a concern for accuracy. The Village Voice used some Google searches to find that while there's been an uptick in news sources' use of the project's proper names (Park51 and the Cordoba Center), "ground zero mosque" is still far and away the most common designation.

What's most interesting about this discussion are the ideas about why a factually inaccurate term has taken such a deep root in coverage of the issue, Armour no prescription, despite efforts to refute it: The Village Voice pointed a finger at cable news, which has devoted the most time to the story, while the Online Journalism Review's Brian McDermott pinpointed our news consumption patterns driven by "warp-speed skimming" and smart-phone headlines that make easy labels more natural for readers and editors."Watery qualifiers like 'near' or 'so-called' don't stick in our brains as much, nor do they help a website climb the SEO ladder."

Poynter ethicist Kelly McBride zeroed in on that idea of search-engine optimization, noting that the AP is being punished for their stand against the term "ground zero mosque" by not appearing very highly on the all-important news searches for that phrase. In order to stay relevant to search engines, Purchase Armour, news organizations have to continue using an inaccurate term once it's taken hold, she concluded. In response, McBride suggested pre-emptively using factchecking resources to nip misconceptions in the bud. Order Armour, "Now that Google makes it impossible to move beyond our distortions -- even when we know better -- we should be prepared," she said.

Google's search and social takes shots: Google takes more than few potshots every week on any number of subjects, but this week, several of them were related to some intriguing future-of-news issues we've been talking about regularly here at the Lab, doses Armour work, so I thought I'd highlight them a bit. Ex-Salon editor Scott Rosenberg took Google News to task for its placement of an Associated Content article at the top of search results on last week's Dr. Laura Schlessinger controversy. Associated Content is the giant "content farm"bought earlier this year by Yahoo, and its Dr. Laura article appears to be a particularly mediocre constructed article cynically designed solely to top Google's ranking for "Dr, Order Armour. Buy generic Armour, Laura n-word."

Rosenberg takes the incident as a sign that reliability of Google News' search results has begun to be eclipsed by content producers' guile: "When Google tells me that this drivel is the most relevant result, I can’t help thinking, the game’s up." The Lab's Jim Barnett also questioned Google CEO Eric Schmidt's recent articulation of the company's idea of automating online serendipity, wondering how a "serendipity algorithm" might shape or limit our worldviews as Google prefers.

Google's social-media efforts also took a few more hits, with Slate's Farhad Manjoo conducting a postmortem on Google Wave, homing in on its ill-defined purpose and unnecessary complexity, buy Armour from canada. Google should have positioned Wave as an advanced tool for sophisticated users, Manjoo argued, but the company instead clumsily billed it as the possible widespread successor to email and instant messenging. Meanwhile, Adam Rifkin of GigaOM criticized the company's acquisition of the social app company Slide (and its social-media attempts in general), Armour blogs, advising Google to buy companies whose products fit well into its current offerings, rather than chasing after the social-gaming industry — which he said "feels like it’s about to collapse on itself."

WikiLeaks, stateless news and transparency: The saga of the open-source leaking website WikiLeaks took a very brief, bizarre turn this weekend, when reports emerged early Saturday that founder Julian Assange was wanted by Swedish authorities for rape, then later that day prosecutors announced he was no longer a suspect. The New York Times provided some great background Order Armour, on Assange's cat-and-mouse games with various world governments, including the United States, which is reportedly considering charging him under the Espionage Act for WikiLeaks' release last month of 92,000 pages of documents regarding the war in Afghanistan.

No one really had any idea what to make of this episode, Armour dangers, and few were bold enough to make any strong speculations publicly. Two bloggers explored the (possible) inner workings of the situation, with Nicholas Mead using it to argue that catching Assange isn't exactly going to stop WikiLeaks — as NYU professor Jay Rosen noted last month, WikiLeaks is the first truly stateless news organization, something only permitted by the structure of the web.

That slippery, Armour recreational, stateless nature extends to WikiLeaks' funding, which The Wall Street Journal focused on this week in a fine feature. Unlike the wide majority of news organizations, there is virtually no transparency to WikiLeaks' funding, though the Journal did piece together a few bits of information: The site has raised $1 million this year, much of its financial network is tied to Germany's Wau Holland Foundation, and two unnamed American nonprofits serve as fronts for the site, Armour trusted pharmacy reviews.

Hyperlocal news and notes: A few hyperlocal news-related ideas and developments worth passing along: Sarah Hartley, who works on The Guardian's hyperlocal news efforts, wrote a thoughtful post attempting to define "hyperlocal" in 10 characteristics. Hyperlocal, she argues, is no longer defined by a tight geographical area, but by an attitude, Order Armour. She follows with a list of defining aspects, such as obsessiveness, Where to buy Armour, fact/opinion blending, linking and community participation. It's a great list, though it seems Hartley may be describing the overarching blogging ethos more so than hyperlocal news per se. (Steve Yelvington, for one, says the term is meaningless.)

Brad Flora at PBS MediaShift provided a helpful list of blogs for hyperlocal newsies to follow (disclosure: The Lab is one of them), buying Armour online over the counter. And two online media giants made concrete steps in long-expected moves toward hyperlocal news: Microsoft's Bing launched its first hyperlocal product with a restaurant guide in Portland, and Yahoo began recruiting writers for a local news site in the San Francisco area.

Reading roundup Order Armour, : Despite the slow news week, there's no shortage of thoughtful pieces on stray subjects that are worth your time. Here's a quick rundown:

— Spot.Us founder David Cohn wrote an illuminating post comparing journalists' (particularly young ones') current search for a way forward in journalism to the ancient Israelites' 40 years of wandering in the desert. TBD's Steve Buttry, a self-described "old guy, Armour no rx, "responded that it may not take a generation to find the next iteration of journalism but said his generation has been responsible for holding innovation back: "We might make it out of the desert, but I think our generation has blown our chance to lead the way."

— A couple of interesting looks at developing stories online: Terry Heaton posited that one reason for declining trust in news organizations is their focus on their own editorial voice to the detriment of the public's understanding (something audiences see in stark relief when comparing coverage of developing news), and Poynter's Steve Myers used the Steven Slater story to examine how news spreads online.

— At The Atlantic, Tim Carmody wrote a fantastic overview of the pre-web history of reading.

— In an argument that mirrors the discussions about the values of the new news ecosystem, former writer Dan Shanoffgave a case for optimism about the current diffused, buy cheap Armour, democratized state of sports media.

— Another glass-half-full post: Mike Mandel broke down journalism job statistics and was encouraged by what he found.

— Finally, for all the students headed back to class right now, the Online Journalism Review's Robert Niles has some of the best journalism-related advice you'll read all year.

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September 14th, 2010

Flagyl Over The Counter

[This post was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Flagyl Over The Counter, on Aug. 20, 2010.]

Patch's big hyperlocal news play: AOL's hyperlocal news project, Patch, launched a site in Morristown, New Jersey, this week — not a big story by itself, but Morristown's site was also the 100th in Patch's network, Flagyl overnight, part of the Internet giant's plan to expand to 500 hyperlocal news sites by the end of the year. Newark's Star-Ledger and NPR both profiled AOL's hyperlocal efforts, with The Star-Ledger focusing on its extensive New Jersey experiment and NPR looking more at the broader picture of hyperlocal news.

PaidContent added some fascinating details from Patch president Warren Webster, such as the tidbit that Patch determines what communities to enter by using a 59-variable algorithm that takes into account factors like income, voter turnout, Flagyl from canadian pharmacy, and local school rankings. And Advertising Age's Edmund Lee compared Patch with several of its large-scale-content rivals, finding it most closely comparable to Philip Anschutz's

As Steve Safran of the local-news blog Lost Remote noted, Patch is hiring 500 journalists to run those sites and is touting itself as the nation's largest hirer of journalists right now, Flagyl Over The Counter. That, of course, is good news for people who care about journalism, but the far bigger issue is whether Patch will be financially sustainable. Safran was skeptical, Flagyl reviews, arguing that Patch needs relevant local advertising, which requires not just reach but relationships. The Boston Phoenix found several other people who also wonder about Patch's long-term prospects. Ken Doctor asked some good questions about Patch's implications for local news, including whether it will disrupt the handcrafted local ad networks that have been the domain of non-templated startup local news blogs.

Facebook is officially going Places Flagyl Over The Counter, : Facebook made a long-anticipated announcement Wednesday, rolling out its new location-based service, Facebook Places. It's all the tech blogs have been talking about since then, Flagyl schedule, so there's plenty to wade through if you're interested in all the details, but Search Engine Land did a good job of discussing the basics of the service and its implications. It made one particularly salient point, given that Facebook has partnered with all of the leading location-based services (FoursquareGowallaBooyah and Yelp): Location check-ins have officially become a commodity, and location services need to expand beyond it. (It also means, Flagyl brand name, to borrow Clay Shirky's point, that location-based technology is about to get socially interesting, since it's quickly becoming technologically boring.)

Facebook isn't yet doing anything to drive revenue from Places, but Lost Remote's Cory Bergman noted that Places' inevitable widespread acceptance could "usher in a new era of local advertising" when Facebook incorporates proximity-based advertising. Facebook is already paving the way for that shift, asking advertisers to help fill out its directory of places. Fast Company's Kit Eaton took a deeper look at how Facebook Places will change location-based advertising, though Terry Heaton called Facebook Places' revenue potential a missed opportunity for local news organizations, Flagyl Over The Counter. Flagyl treatment, Despite Facebook's preemptive privacy defense with Places — by default, check-ins are only visible to friends and can be limited further than that — it still faced some privacy pushback. Several privacy advocates argued that people are going to have a difficult time finding ways to control their privacy on sharing locations, and the ACLU said that once again, Facebook is making it much easier to say "yes" to Places than "no." One of those advocates, dotRights, provided a guide to Facebook Places privacy settings.

Is the web really dead?: In its most recent cover story, Flagyl no prescription, Wired magazine declared the web dead, with its editor, Chris Anderson, arguing that in our quest for portability and ease of use, we've moved into an app-centered world led by Apple, Facebook, Flagyl dangers, Twitter, RSS, Netflix and Pandora. The result, Anderson said, is that we now prefer "semiclosed platforms that use the Internet for transport but not the browser for display," a universe not ruled by Google and HTML. Flagyl Over The Counter, Not surprisingly, such a sweeping statement was met with quite a bit of resistance. Web luminaries Tim O'Reilly and John Battelle dived into the arcane in their lengthy disagreement with Anderson, Flagyl wiki, while plenty of others across the web also had problems with his decree of death. BoingBoing's Rob Beschizza provided the most cogent statistical argument, showing that while Anderson depicts the web as decreasing in the percentage of Internet use, Flagyl natural, its total use is still exploding. Terry Heaton and TechCrunch's Michael Arrington argued that the web still functions well and serves as the basis for many of the "apps" Anderson makes his argument from, with Heaton positing that Wired (and Apple) are still operating on a set of scarcity-based presumptions in a world now defined by abundance. Gawker's Ryan Tate noted that Wired first released its article on its profitable website, while sales of its iPad app are down.

Quite a few others took issue with the idea of declaring things dead in the first place. ReadWriteWeb and Technologizer tallied lists of very much alive things that were long ago declared dead, and The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal criticized Anderson's view that tech is "just a series of increasingly awesomer things that successively displace each other" as long ago proven wrong. Here at the Lab, Jason Fry made a similar point, pointing out that, "the web isn’t dying but being joined by a lot of other contact points between the user and the sea of digital information, with points emerging for different settings, situations, and times of day."

Murdoch's tablet newspaper plan: The Los Angeles Times reported late last week that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, Flagyl Over The Counter. is developing a new national U.S. "digital newspaper" distributed solely as a paid app on tablets like the iPad, kjøpe Flagyl på nett, köpa Flagyl online. The publication would compete with papers like USA Today and The New York Times, would feature short, easily digestible stories for a general audience, and its newsroom would be run under The New York Post. Murdoch said he sees this as a "game changer" in the news industry's efforts to reach younger audiences, but news industry vet Alan Mutter was skeptical: "Newspaper content tends to attract — whether on print or on an iPad or however — mostly the same kind of readers, Flagyl mg, " Mutter told the Times. Flagyl Over The Counter, "Not necessarily younger readers."

Mutter wasn't the only dubious one. Murdoch biographer/gadfly Michael Wolff ripped the idea, and TechCrunch's Paul Carr notedthat News Corp. tried a similar idea in Britain in 2006 for free, and that bombed. This idea, Carr said, "reflects less a bold strategy to convince a new generation of readers that good journalism is worth paying for and more the 79-year News Corp proprietor’s desperation to keep the cash flow coming until the company’s profitability becomes someone else’s problem."

Drawing on a survey of iPad users, cheap FlagylMario Garcia said that Murdoch's plan for quick, snappy stories doesn't fit well with the iPad's primary role as a relaxing device. At least one person was encouraged by Murdoch's idea: Missouri j-prof Clyde Bentley, who called it the cannon shot that will scare the herd of newspaper executives into seriously pursuing mobile media.

News Corp. also made news by donating $1 million to the Republican Governors Association. I'll leave most of the analysis of this move to the politically oriented media critics, though media consultant Ken Doctor outlined a good case for the gift's importance in the journalism world, Flagyl Over The Counter. We also got a report that Murdoch's British tabloid News of the World will go paid online by October. The Guardian's Roy Greenslade wasn't impressed by that initiative's prospects for success. Flagyl without prescription,

Reading roundup: Lots and lots to get to this week. In the spirit of Rupert Murdoch, I'll keep it short and snappy:

— The fallout from last week's Google-Verizon proposal continued into the weekend, with both watchdogs and Google allies raising concerns about the future of net neutrality. Harvard Internet law professor Jonathan Zittrain had plenty more thoughtful things Flagyl Over The Counter, to say about the flap, and  The Wall Street Journal had a lengthy interview with Google CEO Eric Schmidt about that issue and several others.

— We got some discouraging news from a couple of surveys released this week: Gallup found that Americans' trust in traditional news organizations remains historically low, while a comScore study found that (surprise!) even young news junkies don't read newspapers. Each study had a silver lining, though — Gallup found that young people's trust in newspapers is far higher than any other age group, order Flagyl from United States pharmacy, and comScore showed that many young non-print readers are still consuming lots of news online. Here at the Lab, Christopher Sopher wrote a sharp two-part series on attracting young would-be news consumers.

— Google's Lyn Headley is continuing his series of articles explaining the new Rapid News Awards, and each one is a smart analysis of the nature of aggregation and authority. They've all been worth checking out.

— Two great resources on interesting trends within journalism: The Lab's video of a discussion among a who's who of nonprofit journalism leaders on the form's sustainability, and Poynter's Mallary Jean Tenore's article on the encouraging resurgence of long-form journalism in its online form.

— Finally, Florida j-prof Mindy McAdams sparked a great discussion about what skills are necessary for today's reporter. If you're a college student or a budding reporter (or even a veteran one), give this conversation a close read.

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