April 17th, 2014

This Week in Review: Vox and the wonk boom, and Comcast defends its TWC merger plans

December 23rd, 2011

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[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Purchase Flagyl, on Dec. 23, 2011.]

Rethinking political fact-checking: PolitiFact, the fact-checking organization launched in 2007 by the St. Petersburg Times,named its lie of the year this week, Flagyl interactions, and the choice wasn't a popular one: The Democratic claim that Republicans voted to end Medicare was widely denounced among liberal observers (and some conservative ones) as not actually being a lie. As the Washington Monthly's Steve Benen noted, the Medicare claim only finished third in PolitiFact's reader voting behind two Republican lies, leading to the widespread belief, as Benen and the New York Times' Paul Krugman expressed, that PolitiFact chose a Democratic claim this year to create an appearance of balance and placate its conservative critics who believe it's biased against them.

This sort of liberal/conservative bias sniping goes on all the time in political media, canada, mexico, india, but this issue got a bit more interesting from a future-of-news perspective when it became an entree into a discussion of the purpose of the burgeoning genre of "fact-checking" news itself. At Mother Jones, Adam Serwer argued that the reason fact-checking sites exist in the first place is as a correction to the modern sense of news objectivity as a false sense of balance, as opposed to determining the truth — something he said even the fact-checking sites are now succumbing to, Purchase Flagyl.

Several others decried fact-checking operations as being, as Salon's Glenn Greenwald put it, a "scam of neutral expertise." Forbes' John McQuaid said PolitiFact "is trying to referee a fight that, frankly, Flagyl from canadian pharmacy, doesn't really need a referee." Gawker's Jim Newell was more sweeping: "why does anyone care what this gimmicky website has to say, ever?" He argued that fact-checking sites' designations like "pants on fire" and "Pinocchios" are easily digestible gimmicks that lend them a false air of authority, obscuring their flaws in judgment. And the Washington Post's Ezra Klein called the fact-checking model "unsustainable," because it relies on maintaining legitimacy in the eyes of both sides of a hopelessly fractured public.

At The New Republic, Alec MacGillis made the point that fact-checking "invests far too much weight and significance in a handful of arbiters who, Flagyl photos, every once in a while, will really blow a big call." Instead, he said, fact-checking should be the job of every reporter, not just a specialized few. Ordering Flagyl online, Glenn Kessler, the Washington Post's "Fact Checker," responded by saying operations like his aren't intended to be referees or replace reporting, but to complement it. PolitiFact's Bill Adair stood by the organization's choice and said fact-checking "is growing and thriving because people who live outside the partisan bubbles want help sorting out the truth."

An abrupt change at the Times Purchase Flagyl, : New York Times Co. CEO Janet Robinson surprised Times staffers late last week with the sudden announcement of her retirement, and some details have trickled out since then: Reuters reported that she'll get a $15 million exit package and that she and company chairman Arthur Sulzberger Jr. clashed at times, buying Flagyl online over the counter, and the Wall Street Journal reported (paywall) that much of the dissatisfaction with Robinson was over her digital strategy. The Atlantic's Adam Clark Estes summed up the reporting and speculation on Robinson's forced departure by saying that she didn't get along with her bosses, and the Times felt it needed a technologist.

With no successor in sight, GigaOM's Mathew Ingram gave the blueprint of what he would do with the paper: Scale back the paywall, Order Flagyl from mexican pharmacy, and go deeper into apps, events, and e-books. CUNY j-prof Jeff Jarvis proposed a "reverse meter" for the Times — pay up front, then get credit for reading and interacting that delays your next bill. He acknowledged that it wouldn't work in practice, but said it illustrates the idea that paywalls should reward loyal customers, not punish them, Purchase Flagyl. Ingram picked up on the idea and threw out a few more possibilities.

In reality, the Times is in the process of making quite a different set of moves: It's talking about selling off its 16 regional newspapers, not including the Boston Globe, order Flagyl online c.o.d. Media analyst Ken Doctor broke down the development, explaining that the Times Co. is slimming down its peripheral ventures to focus on the Times itself, particularly its digital operation. Poynter's Rick Edmonds said the possible deal marks a thaw Purchase Flagyl, in the newspaper transaction market.

Looking back and forward for news: We're getting into the year-in-review season, Buy Flagyl online no prescription, and Pew's Project for Excellence in Journalism has started it off by releasing its annual analysis of the year's media coverage. They found that this year, just like 2010, was dominated by coverage of the economy, though the Occupy movement emerged as a strong subtheme, and foreign news was a major area of coverage, thanks in large part to the Arab Spring movements, order Flagyl from United States pharmacy. They also examined media coverage in comparison with public interest, finding that journalists moved on from big stories more quickly than the public.

The Lab went big with its year-end feature, publishing more than a dozen predictions for the news world in 2012 from a variety of news and tech luminaries. You can check out that link for the whole list, but here are a few of the trends across the predictions:

— AppsNicholas Carr predicted that "appification" would be the dominant force influencing media and news media next year, opening new arenas for paid content, particularly through "versioning." Tim Carmody said e-readers will take a big leap at the same time, led by Amazon's Kindle. Amy Webb predicted the rise of several sophisticated types of apps, and Gina Masullo Chen envisioned our apps leading us into a more personalized news consumption environment, Purchase Flagyl.

— Big institutions make a stand. Flagyl use, It may be in a continued state of decline, as Martin Langeveld predicted, but Dan Kennedy saw the beginnings of a semi-revival for the newspaper business, accompanied by more paywalls and an feistier defense of their value. On a more ominous front, Dan Gillmor warned of tightening content controls by an oligopoly of copyright holders, government forces, Flagyl pictures, search engines, and others.

— Collaboration and curationEmily Bell saw an increasing realization by news organizations of the importance of networks as part of the reporting process, Burt Herman described the continued emergence of a real-time, collaborative news network, Buy Flagyl from canada, and Paul Bradshaw and Carrie Brown Smith also saw collaboration as central next year. Vadim Lavrusik saw an increasingly sophisticated curation as part of that news environment.

Reading roundup Purchase Flagyl, : This is the last review of the year, so here are the bits and pieces to keep up with during the holidays over the next two weeks:

— Congress' hearings on the Internet censorship bill SOPA adjourned last Friday, with the vote delayed until next year. Cable news finally began acknowledging the story, and the document company Scribd staging an online protest. Techdirt's Mike Masnick continued to write about the bill's dangers, looking at the ability it gives private companies to shut down any website and the way it sets up the legal framework for broader censorship.

— The Wall Street Journal reported on the continued high prices of e-books, a trend that drew criticism from GigaOM's Mathew Ingram and paidContent's Laura Hazard Owen, Flagyl dangers. Elsewhere, Slate's Farhad Manjoo and Wired's Tim Carmody engaged in an interesting discussion about Amazon and independent bookstore — Manjoo praised Amazon for putting independent bookstores into decline, Carmody argued that Amazon has its eyes on a bigger prize, and Manjoo talked about how independent bookstores can fight back.

— A big development in the WikiLeaks and Bradley Manning cases: Wired reported that U.S, Purchase Flagyl. government officials found chat logs with WikiLeaks' Julian Assange on the laptop of Manning, Cheap Flagyl, the Army private charged with leaking information to WikiLeaks. This could be critical in the U.S.' possible prosecution of Assange if the logs show that he induced Manning to leak the documents.

— The Journal Register Co.'s Steve Buttry wrote a series of posts on the practical details of the company's Digital First approach, looking at its journalistic workflowvalueseditor's roles, and ways to think like a digital journalist. Meanwhile, Mashable's Lauren Indvik looked at the Atlantic's transformation into a Digital First publication.

— Some great discussion about solution-oriented journalism this week: David Bornstein made a case for solution journalism at the New York Times, and Free Press' Josh Stearns put together a fantastic set of readings on solution journalism. NYU grad student Blair Hickman also shared a syllabus for a solution journalism unit.

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December 3rd, 2010

Buy Lipitor No Prescription

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Buy Lipitor No Prescription, on Nov. 12, 2010.]

Olbermann and objectivity: Another week, another journalist or pundit disciplined for violating a news organization's codes against appearances of bias: This week (actually, late last week) it was Keith Olbermann, liberal commentator for the liberal cable news channel MSNBC, suspended for donating money to Democratic congressional candidates, in violation of NBC News policy. Lipitor use, Olbermann issued an apology (though, as Forbes' Jeff Bercovici noted, it was laced with animus toward MSNBC), and returned to the air Tuesday. There were several pertinent peripheral bits to this story — Olbermann was reportedly suspended for his refusal to apologize on air, it's unclear whether NBC News' rules have actually applied to MSNBC, numerous other journalists have done just what Olbermann did — but that's the gist of it.

By now, we've all figured out what happens next: Scores of commentators weighed in on the appropriateness (or lack thereof) of Olbermann's suspension and NBC's ban on political contributions, Lipitor blogs. The primary arguments boiled down to the ones expressed by Poynter's Bob Steele and NYU's Jay Rosen in this Los Angeles Times piece: On one side, donating to candidates means journalists are acting as political activists, which corrodes their role as fair, independent reporters in the public interest, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. On the other, being transparent is a better way for journalists to establish trust with audiences than putting on a mask of objectivity.

Generally falling in the first camp are fellow MSNBC host Rachel Maddow ("We're a news operation. The rules around here are part of how you know that."), Northeastern j-prof Dan Kennedy (though he tempered his criticism of Olbermann in a second post), and The New York Times' David Carr ("Why merely annotate events when you can tilt the playing field?"). The Columbia Journalism Review was somewhere in the middle, Lipitor pics, saying Olbermann shouldn't be above the rules, but wondering if those rules need to change.

There were plenty of voices Buy Lipitor No Prescription, in the second camp, including the American Journalism Review's Rem RiederMichael Kinsley at Politico, and Lehigh j-prof Jeremy Littau all arguing for transparency.

Slate media critic Jack Shafer used the flap to urge MSNBC to let Olbermann and Maddow fly free as well-reported, openly partisan shows in the vein of respected liberal and conservative political journals. Jay Rosen took the opportunity to explain his pet phrase "The view from nowhere," which tweaks traditional journalism's efforts to "advertise the viewlessness of the news producer" as a means of gaining trust. He advocates transparency instead, and Terry Heaton provided statistics showing that the majority of young adults don't mind journalists' bias, as long as they're upfront about it.

On The Media's Brooke Gladstone summed up the issue well: "Ultimately, kjøpe Lipitor på nett, köpa Lipitor online, it’s the reporting that matters, reporting that is undistorted by attempts to appear objective, reporting that calls a lie a lie right after the lie, not in a box labeled “analysis,” reporting that doesn't distort truth by treating unequal arguments equally."

Commodify your paywall: We talked quite a bit last week about the new numbers on the paywall at Rupert Murdoch's Times of London, and new items in that discussion kept popping up this week. The Times released a few more details (flattering ones, Lipitor mg, naturally) about its post-paywall web audience. Among the most interesting figures is that the percentage of U.K.-based visitors to The Times' site has more than doubled since February, rising to 75 percent, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. Post-paywall visitors are also visiting the website more frequently and are more wealthier, according to News Corp.

Of course, the overall number of visitors is still way down, and the plan continued to draw heat. In a wide-ranging interview on Australian radio, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger expressed surprise at the fact that The Times' print circulation dropped as their print-protectionist paywall went up. That, Lipitor dangers, he said, "suggests to me that we overlook the degree to which the digital forms of our journalism act as a kind of sort of marketing device for the newspapers." ResourceWebs' Evan Britton gave five reasons why news paywalls won't work, and Kachingle founder Cynthia Typaldos argued that future news paywalls will be tapping into a limited pool of people willing to pay for news on the web, squeezing each other out of the same small market.

Clay Shirky used The Times' paywall as a basis for some smart thoughts Buy Lipitor No Prescription, about why newspaper paywalls don't work in general. The Times' paywall represents old thinking, Shirky wrote (and the standard argument against it has been around just as long), but The Times' paywall feels differently because it's being taken as a "referendum on the future." Shirky said The Times is turning itself into a newsletter, Buy Lipitor without prescription, without making any fundamental modifications to its product or the basic economics of the web. "Paywalls do indeed help newspapers escape commodification, but only by ejecting the readers who think of the product as a commodity. This is, invariably, most of them," he wrote.

A conversation about blogging, voice, and ego: A singularly insightful conversation about blogging was sparked this week by Marc Ambinder, Lipitor canada, mexico, india, who wrote a thoughtful goodbye post at his long-running blog at The Atlantic. In it, Ambinder parsed out differences between good print journalism (ego-free, reliant on the unadorned facts for authority) and blogging (ego-intensive, requires the writer to inject himself into the narrative). With the switch from blogging to traditional reporting, Ambinder said, "I will no longer be compelled to turn every piece of prose into a personal, conclusive argument, to try and fit it into a coherent framework that belongs to a web-based personality called 'Marc Ambinder' that people read because it's 'Marc Ambinder,' rather than because it's good or interesting."

The folks at the fantastically written blog Snarkmarket used the post as a launching point for their own thoughts about the nature of blogging, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. Matt Thompson countered that Ambinder was reducing an incredibly diverse form into a single set of characteristics, taking particular exception to Ambinder's ego dichotomy. Lipitor dosage, Tim Carmody mused on blogging, voice, and authorship; and Robin Sloan defended Ambinder's decision to leave the "Thunderdome of criticism" that is political blogging. If you care at all about blogging or writing for the web in general, make sure to give all four posts a thorough read.

TBD's (possible) content/aggregation conflict: The new Washington-based local news site TBD has been very closely watchedsince it was launched in August, and it hit its first big bump in the road late last week, as founding general manager Jim Bradyresigned in quite a surprising move. In a memo Buy Lipitor No Prescription, to TBD employees, TBD owner Robert Allbritton (who also launched Politico) said Brady left because of "stylistic differences" with Allbritton. Despite the falling-out, Lipitor duration, Brady, a veteran, spoke highly of where TBD is headed in an email to staff and a few tweets.

But the immediate questions centered on the nature of those differences between Allbritton and Brady. FishbowlDC reported and Business Insider's Henry Blodget inferred from Allbritton's memo that the conflict came down to an original-content-centric model (Allbritton) and a more aggregation-based model (Brady). Brady declared his affirmation of both pieces — he told Poynter's Steve Myers he's pro-original content and the conflict wasn't old media/new media, but didn't go into many more details — but that didn't keep Blodget from taking the aggregation side: The web, My Lipitor experience, he said, "has turned aggregation into a form of content--and a very valuable one at that." Lost Remote's Cory Bergman, meanwhile, noted that while creating content is expensive, Allbritton's made the necessary investments and made it profitable before with Politico.

A new iPad app and competitor: There were two substantive pieces of tablet-related news this week: First, The Washington Post released its iPad app, accompanying its launch with a fun ad most everyone seemed to enjoy, Buy Lipitor No Prescription. Poynter's Damon Kiesow wrote a quick summary of the app, which got a decent review from The Post's Rob Pegoraro. For you design geeks, Sarah Sampsel wrote two good posts about the app design process, Lipitor over the counter.

The other tablet tidbit was the release of Samsung's Galaxy Tab, which runs on Google's Android system. Kiesow rounded up a few of the initial reviews from All Things Digital (a real iPad competitor, though the iPad is better), The New York Times (beautiful with some frustrations), Wired (more convenient than the iPad, but has stability problems) and Gizmodo ("a grab bag of neglect, Lipitor from mexico, good intentions and poor execution"). Buy Lipitor No Prescription, Kiesow also added a few initial impressions of the Galaxy's implications for publishers, predicting that as it takes off, it will put pressure on publishers to move to HTML5 mobile websites, rather than developing native apps.

In other tablet news, MediaWeek looked at the excitement the iPad is generating within the media industry, but ESPN exec John Skipper isn't buying the hype, telling MarketWatch's Jon Friedman, "Whenever a new platform comes up, people want to take the old platform and transport it to the new platform." It didn't work on the Internet, Skipper said, it won't work on the iPad either, generic Lipitor.

Reading roundup: More thoughtful stuff about news and the web was written this week than most normal people have time to get to. Here's a sample:

— First, a piece of news: U.S. News & World Report announced last week that it's dropping its regular print edition and going essentially online-only, only printing single-topic special issues for newsstand sales. The best analysis on the move was at Advertising Age, Buy Lipitor No Prescription.

— Two great pieces on journalism's collaborative future: Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger in essay form, and UBC j-prof Alfred Hermida in audio and slide form. Where can i buy cheapest Lipitor online, — Poynter published an essay by NYU professor Clay Shirky on "the shock of inclusion" in journalism and the obsolescence of the term "consumer." Techdirt's Mike Masnick added a few quick thoughts of his own.

— Two cool posts on data journalism — an overview on its rise by The Columbia Journalism Review's Lauren Kirchner, and a list of great tools by Michelle Minkoff.

— Finally, two long thinkpieces on Facebook that, quite honestly, I haven't gotten to read yet — one by Zadie Smith at The New York Review of Books, and the other by The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal. I'm going to spend some time with them this weekend, and I have a feeling you probably should, too.

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September 27th, 2010

Lipitor Over The Counter

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Lipitor Over The Counter, on Sept. 24, 2010.]

Is Apple giving publishers a raw deal?: The San Jose Mercury News' report that Apple is moving toward a newspaper and magazine subscription plan via its App Store didn't immediately generate much talk when it was published last week, but the story picked up quite a bit of steam this week. Bloomberg and The Wall Street Journal both confirmed the story over the weekend, reporting that Apple may introduce the service early next year along with a new iPad. The service, they said, will be similar to Apple's iBook store, Lipitor class, and Bloomberg reported that it will be separate from the App Store.

Those reports were met with near-universal skepticism — not of their accuracy, but of Apple's motivations and trustworthiness within such a venture. Former journalist Steve Yelvington sounded the alarm most clearly: "Journalists and publishers, Apple is not your friend." It's a corporation, Yelvington said, Lipitor canada, mexico, india, and like all corporations, it will do anything — including ripping you apart — to pursue its own self-interest.

Several other observers fleshed out some of the details of Yelvington's concern: EMarketer's Paul Verna compared the situation to Apple's treatment of the music industry with iTunes, and GigaOM's Mathew Ingram and TechCrunch's MG Siegler wondered whether publishers would balk at giving up data about their subscribers to Apple or at Apple's reported plans to take a 30% share of subscription revenue, Lipitor Over The Counter. Ingram predicted that publishers would play ball with Apple, but warned that they might wind up "sitting in a corner counting their digital pennies, while Apple builds the business that they should have built themselves." Dovetailing with their worries was another story of Apple's control over news content on its platform, as Network World reported that Apple was threatening to remove Newsday's iPad app over a (quite innocuous) commercial by the newspaper that Apple allegedly found offensive.

Media analyst Ken Doctor broke down publishers' potential reactions to Apple's initiative, looking at the plan's appeal to them ("It offers a do-over, Lipitor samples, the chance to redraw the pay/free lines of the open web") and their possible responses (accept, negotiate with Apple, or look into "anti-competitive inquiries"). In a post at the Lab, Doctor also took a quick look at Apple's potential subscription revenue through this arrangement, an amount he said could be "mind-bending."

All Things Digital's Peter Kafka noted one indicator that publishers are in serious need of a subscription service on the iPad, Online Lipitor without a prescription, pointing out that Time Inc.'s Sports Illustrated can't pay for the designers to make its iPad app viewable in two directions because, according to its digital head, it doesn't have the money without an iPad subscription program. Gizmodo's Matt Buchanan used the same situation to explain why iPad subscriptions would be so critical for publishers and readers.

A coup for journalism with a point of view Lipitor Over The Counter, : It hasn't been unusual over the past year to read about big-name journalists jumping from legacy-media organizations to web-journalism outfits, but two of those moves this week seemed to mark a tipping point for a lot of the observers of the future-of-journalism world. Both were made by The Huffington Post, as it nabbed longtime Newsweek correspondent Howard Fineman and top New York Times business writer Peter Goodman.

The Wrap's Dylan Stableford looked at what Fineman's departure means for Newsweek (he's one of at least 10 Newsweek editorial staffers to leave since the magazine's sale was announced last month), but what got most people talking was Goodman's explanation of why he was leaving: "It's a chance to write with a point of view, Lipitor duration," he said. "With the dysfunctional political system, old conventional notions of fairness make it hard to tell readers directly what's going on. This is a chance for me to explore solutions in my economic reporting."

That kind of reporting (as opposed to, as Goodman called it, "laundering my own views" by getting someone from a thinktank to express them in an article) is exactly what many new-media folks have been advocating, Rx free Lipitor, and hearing someone from The New York Times express it so clearly felt to them like a turning point. The tone of centrist detachment of mainstream journalism "has become a liability in keeping newsroom talent," declared NYU professor Jay Rosen on Twitter, Lipitor Over The Counter. Others echoed that thought: Gawker's Hamilton Nolan extolled the virtues of being "able to call bullshit bullshit," and former Salon editor Scott Rosenberg said legacy news orgs like The Times need to find a way to allow its reporters more freedom to voice their perspective while maintaining their standards. Salon's Dan Gillmor agreed with Rosenberg on the centrality of human voice within journalism and noted that this exodus to new media is also a sign of those sites' financial strength.

Former McClatchy exec Howard Weaver countered that while transparency and clear voice is preferable to traditional "objectivity," freeing traditional journalists isn't as simple as just spilling their biases. Advocacy journalism is not just giving an opinion, he said, it's a "disciplined, order Lipitor from mexican pharmacy, ethical posture that tries to build truth out of evidence, regardless of the outcome."

Getting journalism startups off the ground: If you're interested in the journalism startup scene — for-profit or nonprofit — you got a gold mine of observations and insights this week. Over at PBS' Idea Lab, Brad Flora, founder of the Chicago blog network Windy Citizenexamined five mistakes that kill local news blogs. Here's how he summed his advice up: " Lipitor Over The Counter, You are not starting a blog, you are launching a small business. Purchase Lipitor for sale, You are no different from the guy opening a bar up the road. ... You need to know something about blogging and social media, yes, but what you really need to bone up on is what it takes to run a small business." The post has some fantastic comments, including a great set of advice from The Batavian's Howard Owens. On his own blog, Owens also gave some pretty thorough tips on developing advertising revenue at a local news startup.

On the nonprofit side, Lipitor from canadian pharmacy, the Knight Citizen News Network went even deeper into startup how-to, providing a comprehensive 12-step guide to launching a nonprofit news organization. It may be the single best resource on the web for the practical work of starting a nonprofit news site, Lipitor Over The Counter. Voice of San Diego is one of the most successful examples of those sites, and its CEO, Scott Lewis told the story of his organization and the flame-out of the for-profit San Diego News Network as an example of the importance of what he calls "revenue promiscuity."

David Cohn, founder of another nonprofit news startup, Purchase Lipitor online, Spot.Us, also looked at six new journalism startups, leading off with Kommons, a question-answering site built around Twitter and co-founded by NYU Local founder Cody Brown. Rachel Sklar of Mediaite gave it a glowing review, describing it as "a community that seeks smart, conversation-furthering answers prompted by smart, probing questions — publicly." She also said it sneakily lures users into giving it free content, Lipitor dosage, though Brown responded that anyone who's ever asked you to interview has been trying to do the same thing — only without giving you any control over how your words get used. (Kommons isn't being sneaky, he said. You know you're not getting paid going in.)

Three more future-oriented j-school programs: After last week's discussion about the role of journalism schools in innovation, news of new j-school projects continued to roll in this week. City University of New York announced it's expanding its graduate course in entrepreneurial journalism into the United States' first master's degree Lipitor Over The Counter, in that area. New-media guru Jeff Jarvis, Order Lipitor online overnight delivery no prescription, who will direct the program, wrote that he wants CUNY to lead a movement to combine journalism and entrepreneurship skills at schools across the country.

Two nationwide news organizations are also developing new programs in partnership with j-schools: reported that CNN is working on a mentoring initiative with journalism students called iReport University and has signed up City University London, and AOL announced that its large-scale hyperlocal project, Patch, is teaming up with 13 U.S. j-schools for a program called PatchU that will give students college credit for working on a local Patch site under the supervision of a Patch editor. Of course, buy Lipitor without prescription, using college students is a nice way to get content for cheap, something Ken Doctor noted as he also wondered what the extent of Patch's mentoring would be.

Reading roundup: As always, there's plenty of good stuff to get to, Lipitor Over The Counter. Here's a quick glance:

— Former Washington Post executive editor Len Downie gave a lecture in the U.K. Wednesday night that was, for the most part, a pretty standard rundown of what the U.S. Lipitor price, journalism ecosystem looks like from a traditional-media perspective. What got the headlines, though, was Downie's dismissal of online aggregators as "parasites living off journalism produced by others." Gawker's Hamilton Nolan gave it an eye-roll, and Terry Heaton pushed back at Downie, too. Lipitor Over The Counter, Earlier in the week, media analyst Frederic Filloux broke down the differences between the good guys and bad guys in online aggregation.

— The New York Times published an interesting story on the social news site Digg and its redesign to move some power out of the hands of its cadre of "power" users. The Next Web noted that Digg's traffic has been dropping pretty significantly, Lipitor schedule, and Drury University j-prof Jonathan Groves wondered whether Digg is still relevant.

— A couple of hyperlocal tidbits: A new Missouri j-school survey found that community news site users are more satisfied with those sites than their local mainstream media counterparts, and Poynter's Rick Edmonds posited that speed is less important than news orgs might think with hyperlocal news.

— Finally, a couple of follow-ups to Dean Starkman's critique of the journalism "hamster wheel" last week: Here at the Lab, Nikki Usher looked at five ways newsrooms can encourage creativity despite increasing demands, and in a very smart response to Starkman, Reuters' Felix Salmon argued that one of the biggest keys to finding meaning in an information-saturated online journalism landscape is teaching journalists to do more critical reading and curating.

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June 17th, 2010

Armour Cost

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Armour Cost, on April 30, 2010.]

Apple and Gizmodo’s shield law test: The biggest tech story of the last couple of weeks has undoubtedly been the gadget blog Gizmodo’s photos of a prototype of Apple’s next iPhone that was allegedly left in a bar by an Apple employee. That story got a lot more interesting for journalism- and media-oriented folks this week, when we found out that police raided a Gizmodo blogger’s apartment based on a search warrant for theft.

What had been a leaked-gadget story turned into a case study on web journalism and the shield law. Mashable and Poynter did a fine job of laying out the facts of the case and the legal principles at stake: Was Gizmodo engaged in acts of journalism when it paid for the lost iPhone and published information about it. Social media consultant Simon Owens has a good roundup of opinions on the issue, including whether the situation would be different if Gizmodo hadn’t bought the iPhone.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, Where can i find Armour online, a digital rights group, came out most strongly against the raid, arguing to Wired and Laptop magazine and in its own post that California law is clear that the Gizmodo blogger was acting as a reporter. The Citizen Media Law Project’s Sam Bayard agreed, backing the point up with a bit more case history. Not everyone had Gizmodo’s back, comprar en línea Armour, comprar Armour baratos, though: In a piece written before the raid, media critic Jeff Bercovici of Daily Finance said that Gizmodo was guilty of straight-up theft, journalistic motives or no.

J-prof Jay Rosen added a helpful clarification to the “are bloggers journalists” debate (it’s actually about whether Gizmodo was engaged in an act of journalism, he says) and ex-Saloner Scott Rosenberg reached back to a piece he wrote five years ago to explain why that debate frustrates him so much. Meanwhile, the Columbia Journalism Review noted that the Gizmodo incident was just one in a long line of examples of Apple’s anti-press behavior.

Bridging the newsroom-academy gap: Texas j-prof Rosental Alves held his annual International Symposium on Online Journalism last weekend, and thanks to a lot of people’s work in documenting the conference, we have access to much of what was presented and discussed there, Armour Cost. What is Armour, The conference site and Canadian professor Alfred Hermida devoted about 20 posts each to the event’s sessions and guests, so there’s loads of great stuff to peruse if you have time.

The conference included presentations on all kinds of stuff like Wikipedianews site designonline commentsmicropayments, and news innovation, buy Armour online no prescription, but I want to highlight two sessions in particular. The first is the keynote by Demand Media’s Steven Kydd, who defended the company’s content and business model from criticism that it’s a harmful “content farm.” Kydd described Demand Media as “service journalism,” providing content on subjects that people want to know about while giving freelancers another market. Armour results, You can check summaries of his talk at the official siteHermida’s blog, and in a live blog by Matt Thompson. The conference site also has video of the Q&A session and reflections on Kydd’s charisma and a disappointing audience reaction. The other session worth taking a closer look at was a panel on nonprofit journalism, which, judging from Hermida and the conference’s roundups, purchase Armour for sale, seemed especially rich with insight into particular organizations’ approaches.

The conference got Matt Thompson, a veteran of both the newsroom and the academy who’s currently working for NPR, thinking about what researchers can do to bring the two arenas closer together. “I saw a number of studies this weekend that working journalists would find fascinating and helpful,” he wrote. “Yet they’re not available in forms I’d feel comfortable sending around the newsroom.” Armour Cost, He has some practical, doable tips that should be required reading for journalism researchers.

Making sense of social data: Most of the commentary on Facebook’s recent big announcements came out last week, but there’s still been plenty of good stuff since then. Armour from mexico, The tech blog ReadWriteWeb published the best explanation yet of what these moves mean, questioning whether publishers will be willing to give up ownership of their comments and ratings to Facebook. Writers at ReadWriteWeb and O’Reilly Radar also defended Facebook’s expansion against last week’s privacy concerns.

Three other folks did a little bit of thinking about the social effects of Facebook’s spread across the web: New media prof Jeff Jarvis said Facebook isn’t just identifying us throughout the web, it’s adding a valuable layer of data on places, things, ideas, where to buy Armour, everything. But, he cautions, that data isn’t worth much if it’s controlled by a company and the crowd isn’t able to create meaning out of it. Columbia grad student Vadim Lavrusik made the case for a "social nut graph" that gives context to this flood of data and allows people to do something more substantive than "like" things. Australia, uk, us, usa, PR blogger Paul Seaman wondered about how much people will trust Facebook with their data while knowing that they’re giving up some of their privacy rights for Facebook’s basic services. And social media researcher danah boyd had some insightful thoughts about the deeper issue of privacy in a world of "big data."

The Wall Street Journal goes local: The Wall Street Journal made the big move in its war with The New York Times this week, launching its long-expected New York edition, Armour Cost. The Times’ media columnist, David Carr, took a pretty thorough look at the first day’s offering and the fight in general, and Columbia j-prof Sree Sreenivasan liked what he saw from the Journal on day one.

Slate media critic Jack Shafer said the struggle between the Journal and the Times is a personal one for the Journal’s owner, Rupert Murdoch — he wants to own Manhattan, Armour online cod, and he wants to see the Times go down in flames there. Meanwhile, Jeff Jarvis stifled a yawn, calling it “two dinosaurs fighting over a dodo bird.”

Along with its local edition, Cheap Armour no rx, the Journal also announced a partnership with the geolocation site Foursquare that gives users news tips or factoids when they check in at certain places around New York — a bit more of a hard-news angle than Foursquare’s other news partnerships so far. Over at GigaOm, Mathew Ingram applauded the Journal’s innovation but questioned whether it would help the paper much.

Apple and app control: The fury over Pulitzer-winning cartoonist Mark Fiore’s proposed iPhone app has largely died down, but there were a few more app-censorship developments this week to note. cartoonist Daryl Cagle pointed out that despite Apple’s letup in Fiore’s case, they’re not reconsidering their rejection of his “Tiger Woods cartoons” app, where can i buy Armour online. Political satirist Daniel Kurtzman had two of his apps rejected Armour Cost, , too, and an app of Michael Wolff’s Newser column — which frequently mocks Apple’s Steve Jobs — was nixed as well. Asked about the iPad at the aforementioned International Symposium on Online Journalism, renowned web scholar Ethan Zuckerman said Apple’s control over apps makes him "very nervous."

The New Yorker’s Ken Auletta also went deep into the iPad’s implications for publishers this week in a piece on the iPad, the Kindle and the book industry. You can hear him delve into those issues in interviews with Charlie Rose and Fresh Air’s Terry Gross.

Reading roundup: We had some great smaller conversations on a handful of news-related topics this week.

— Long-form journalism has been getting a lot of attention lately. Online buy Armour without a prescription, Slate’s Jack Shafer wrote about, an effort to collect and link to the best narrative journalism on the web. Several journalistic heavyweights — Gay Talese, Buzz Bissinger, Bill Keller — sang the praises of narrative journalism during a Boston University conference on the subject.

Nieman Storyboard focused on Keller’s message, in which he expressed optimism that long-form journalism could thrive in the age of the web, Armour pharmacy. Jason Fry agreed with Keller’s main thrust but took issue with the points he made to get there, Armour Cost. Meanwhile, Jonathan Stray argued that “the web is more amenable to journalism of different levels of quality and completeness” and urges journalists not to cut on the web what they’re used to leaving out in print.

— FEED co-founder Steven Johnson gave a lecture at Columbia last week about the future of text, especially as it relates to tablets and e-readers. You can check it out here as an essay and here on video. Armour cost, Johnson criticizes the New York Times and Wall Street Journal for creating iPad apps that don’t let users manipulate text. The American Prospect’s Nancy Scola appreciates the argument, but says Johnson ignored the significant cultural impact of a closed app process.

— Two intriguing sets of ideas for news design online: Belgian designer Stijn Debrouwere has spent the last three weeks writing a thoughtful series of posts exploring a new set of principles for news design, and French media consultant Frederic Filloux argues that most news sites are an ineffective, restrictive funnel that cut users off from their most interesting content. Instead, he proposes a “serendipity test” for news sites.

— Finally, if you have 40 free minutes sometime, I highly recommend watching the Lab editor Joshua Benton’s recent lecture at Harvard’s Berkman Center on aggregation and journalism. Benton makes a compelling argument from history that all journalism is aggregation and says that if journalists don’t like the aggregation they’re seeing online, they need to do it better. It makes for a great introductory piece on journalism practices in transition on the web.


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