List
February 18th, 2011

Glucophage Price

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Glucophage Price, on Feb. 11, 2011.]

AOL scoops up Arianna: The week's biggest media story was broken just a couple of hours after the Super Bowl on Sunday, when Kara Swisher of All Things D reported that AOL would buy The Huffington Post for $315 million (here's video of her interview with Arianna Huffington and AOL CEO Tim Armstrong). Swisher's post and this New York Times article provide just about all the background information you should need on the deal, along with The Huffington Post's press release and Huffington's column on the acquisition. Glucophage canada, mexico, india, The deal was seen by many as a bold one — a "fourth-quarter Hail Mary pass," as The New Yorker's Ken Auletta wrote — and reaction on the web (also summed up well by GigaOM's Mathew Ingram) was decidedly mixed. The thumbs-ups came from a eclectic mix of critics: Henry Blodget of Business Insider called it a smart risk, Reuters' Felix Salmon and All Things D's Peter Kafka said the two companies' needs fit each other well, with AOL getting a clear editorial voice (Salmon) and a "content-making machine" (Kafka). CUNY j-prof Jeff Jarvis said what AOL will find most valuable in HuffPo will not be content, but "a new cultural understanding of media that is built around the value of curation, the power of peers, the link economy, passion as an asset, and celebrity as a currency."

There were also plenty of people who shook (or at least scratched) their heads at the deal, including many of HuffPo's own readers and writers, Glucophage Price. Shira Ovide of The Wall Street Journal called it AOL's admission that its content strategy isn't working, and industry analyst Alan Mutter said AOL overpaid, online buy Glucophage without a prescription. The Guardian's Jemima Kiss blasted the move as "soullessly commercial," and Salon vet Scott Rosenberg contended that Huffington's once-distinctive brand will dissolve into AOL's bland corporatism. PaidContent's David KaplanDan Lyons, and Om Malik of GigaOM both pointed to advertising struggles, Discount Glucophage, with Malik arguing that AOL has "not yet come to terms with the futility of chasing page views."

A few themes came up repeatedly in commentary about the two companies; one was HuffPo's expertise in that notorious (some would say dark) art known as search engine optimization. Salon's Alex Pareene declared the new organization "the single largest SEO-gaming operation ever created" and the LA Times' James Rainey explained the appeal that the Post's SEO skills bring. Slate's Farhad Manjoo (who wins this week's award for best lead) made the case that AOL/HuffPo's SEO-heavy strategy is risky in the long-term because "they won't be able to fool the computers forever." (Capital New York's Tom McGeveran made a similar point Glucophage Price, .) HuffPo's new AOL corporate empire-mate, Paul Carr of TechCrunch, reaffirmed his hatred for HuffPo's SEO tactics but said the deal could still be a good one for AOL.

The second theme was the fact that the Post doesn't pay most of its writers, a strategy that Tim Rutten of the Los Angeles Times likened to "a galley rowed by slaves and commanded by pirates." Dan Gillmor's tone was a bit milder, but he, Glucophage samples, too, urged Huffington to start paying her most productive bloggers, and Northeastern j-prof Dan Kennedy wondered whether bloggers might be less willing to go unpaid under a mega-corporation like AOL. Reason's Matt Welch defended Huffington against Rutten's charges, and Time's James Poniewozik said it's possible AOL/HuffPo could be signaling a move toward more expensive, Australia, uk, us, usa, quality content.

A few miscellaneous pieces of sharp commentary: GigaOM's Mathew Ingram said AOL needs HuffPo to help its other online content initatives figure out how the Internet works, and media analyst Ken Doctor saw AOL/HuffPo as a potential free alternative to Rupert Murdoch's steadily building paid-content empire. There were also plenty of posts about what the political viewpoint of the new organization would be, and while I haven't waded into that discussion, I do like NYU j-prof Jay Rosen's concept of "ideological innovation" in online journalism.

Changing coverage of a changing world: As the protests in Egypt have continued, so has the conversation about its media-related implications, and just as in last week, much of the talk centered on Al Jazeera, Glucophage Price. The New York Times examined the network's influence on the protests, Glucophage natural, as well as its efforts to gain more access to American viewers. Throughout the past two weeks, as the Lab's Justin Ellis and Twitter's Robin Sloan pointed out, Al Jazeera has been using social media to distribute its news to American audiences. Meanwhile, Glucophage overnight, Sheila Carapico at Foreign Policy argued that Al Jazeera and other TV networks can't give us a full picture of what's going on in Egypt.

There's been other fantastic journalism arising from the Egyptian protests, including the work of NPR's Andy Carvin to curate news and voices of the conflict on Twitter. Glucophage Price, In an illuminating interview with The Atlantic, Carvin argued that curation — the process of capturing the most elements of a story from various sources and passing them along — has always been a part of journalism. In a more academic piece at the Lab, USC grad student Nikki Usher explained how the protests are expanding the idea of a media event, with social media, webstreams, Glucophage cost, and the mainstream media "all working together to create a much larger, more nuanced picture of the live broadcasting of history."

The debate over social media's role in revolutions continued to roil, with several more writers responding to Malcolm Gladwell's brief New Yorker post arguing that the role Twitter & Co. in social activism like the Egyptian protests is overrated. UT-Dallas prof David Parry, Glucophage images, The Awl's Maria Bustillos, new media exec Rex Hammock, UMBC prof Zeynek Tufekci, and web philosopher David Weinbergerall weighed in with their rejoinders to Gladwell, in a discussion that Washington grad student Deen Freelon has mapped out far more expertly than I could.

Speeding up The Daily: The negative buzz around The Daily that began last week continued to pile up this week, leading to, Glucophage use, among other things, a "We're listening" blog post by the new "tablet newspaper." One of the issues that drew criticism was The Daily's long load time, as John Gruber of Daring Fireball compared it unfavorably to Flipboard, and paidContent's Staci Kramer explained her own loading glitches. Both Gruber and Kramer argued that while it seem minor, load time is a big deal to users, and The New York Times' Nick Bilton made a similar pointBy being too slow and bulky, digital magazines like The Daily "almost defeat one of their main intended purposes, the promise of instant access to content and information."

The reviews kept pouring in as well, led by an insightful critique of The Daily's design by Stephen Coles at Fonts In Use, Glucophage Price. The primary criticism continued in the same vein as last week: The Daily's content just doesn't cut it. John Gapper of the Financial Times and Skip Ferderber of Crosscut made the point this week, Glucophage wiki, and Poynter's Damon Kiesow noted that new content is tough to find. Paul Davis of Shareable also chimed in with a criticism of The Daily's shortcomings with limited sharing options.

But there were a few who were generally impressed with The Daily's first week, including MinnPost's John Dreinan and industry analyst Alan Mutter, who liked its concise storytelling, multimedia integration and interactive advertising. Damon Kiesow and The Columbia Journalism Review's Lauren Kirchner both looked to other media efforts for lessons for The Daily — Kiesow to various other iPad apps, and Kirchner to the mid-1990s debut of Slate and Salon, Glucophage no prescription.

Gawker evolves the blog: We've been hearing about it since November, and this week Gawker officially launched its redesign, which reflects to a more magazine-style emphasis from a purer blog format. The Lab's Megan Garber captured what the move means Glucophage Price, particularly in terms of Gawker's advertising strategy, explaining how it's appropriated parts of the TV and magazine models to capitalize on its brand as a whole: "It’s moved, it seems, beyond simply selling its readers to advertisers. Now, it is simply selling itself."

Former Gawker Media contributor Latoya Peterson pointed to the outrage by Gawker blogs' readers and used it to argue that Gawker's new, My Glucophage experience, more controlled design is subverting the fast-posting, skim-friendly style it helped make a blogging standard. Rex Sorgatz was also skeptical of the change, asserting that the redesign would have to be rolled back or reworked within months and challenging anyone to bet him otherwise — a wager that was taken up by Gawker chief Nick Denton himself, using pageviews as the determining factor.

TBD takes a step back: TBD, a online local news operation based in Washington, real brand Glucophage online, D.C., debuted last August to much fanfare, but it took a major hit when the Washington Post reported that its owner Robert Allbritton (who also owns Politico) would have his local TV station WJLA take it over. TBD editor-in-chief Erik Wemple told the Lab's Megan Garber that the move wouldn't be as bad as it appeared, but it was still widely interpreted as "a retreat from the original vision of TBD, Purchase Glucophage online no prescription, " in the Post's words. Jim Brady, the site's former general manager, called it "not good news," and NYU j-prof Jay Rosen summed it up as "the TV guys won."

In the wake of the news, several observers expressed their frustration: Media consultant Mark Potts ripped Allbritton for not allowing the site breathing room to innovate, and media analyst Janet Coats held it up as an example of old media's resistance to change. Terry Heaton and Lost Remote's Cory Bergman used the episode to talk about the tensions involved when TV stations are affiliated with online media efforts, Glucophage Price.

Reading roundup: There's still quite a bit to get to, but I'll run through it quickly:

—  Re Wikileaks: New York Times executive editor Bill Keller edged toward defining WikiLeaks as something a lot like journalism, The Nation's Greg Mitchell explained why the mainstream media is skeptical of WikiLeaks, the Personal Democracy Forum's Micah Sifry and NYU prof Clay Shirky gave some reasons for WikiLeaks' revolutionary nature, and at The Guardian, Evgeny Morozov argued that WikiLeaks can't continue much longer in its current form.

— Yahoo announced a move toward more personal content, particularly tablet-based. The New York Times explained why.

— At the National Sports Journalism Center, Jason Fry wrote a wonderful piece talking about how much less valuable scoops have become in a commoditized news world, and what journalists should do as a result. Craig Calcaterra of the baseball blog Hardball Talk expanded on the idea, offering a vision for the role of bloggers and reporters in a commodity-news environment.

— Two pieces to chew on this weekend, one short and one long: Dave Winer's plea to news organizations to join their communities online, and The New Yorker's Adam Gopnik's musings on the Internet and our interior lives.

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February 18th, 2011

Bactrim Cost

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Bactrim Cost, on Feb. 4, 2011.]

Al Jazeera, the network, and social activism: For the last week, the eyes of the world have been riveted to the ongoing protests in Egypt, and not surprisingly, the news media themselves have been a big part of that story, Bactrim interactions, too. Many of them have been attacked by President Hosni Mubarak's lackeys, but the crisis has also been a breeding ground for innovative journalism techniques. Mashable put together a roundup of the ways journalists have used Twitter, Facebook, streaming video, Bactrim without a prescription, Tumblr, and Audioboo, and the Lab highlighted reporting efforts on Facebookcuration by Sulia, and explainers by Mother Jones. Google and Twitter also created Speak to Tweet to allow Egyptians cut off from the Internet to communicate.

But the organization that has shined the brightest over the past 10 days is unquestionably Al Jazeera, Bactrim Cost. The Qatar-based TV network has dominated web viewing, and has used web audio updates and Creative Commons to get information out quickly to as many people as possible, Bactrim long term.

Al Jazeera also faced stiff censorship efforts from the Egyptian government, which stripped its Egyptian license and shut down its Cairo bureau, then later stole some of its camera equipment. Through it all, the broadcaster kept up live coverage that online and offline, was considered the most comprehensive of any news organization. Low dose Bactrim, As Lost Remote's Cory Bergman pointed, Al Jazeera's coverage showed the continued power of compelling live video in a multimedia world.

Salon's Alex Pareene called Al Jazeera's coverage Bactrim Cost, an indictment on the U.S.' cable networks, and CUNY j-prof Jeff Jarvis and others urged cable companies to carry Al Jazeera English. Tech pioneer Doc Searls used the moment as a call for a more open form of cable TV: "The message cable should be getting is not just 'carry Al Jazeera,' but 'normalize to the Internet.' Open the pipes. Give us à la carte choices. Let us get and pay for what we want, not just what gets force-fed in bundles."

The protests also served as fresh fuel for an ongoing debate about the role of social media in social change and global political activism. Several critics — including Wired's David Kravets, Bactrim no rx, The New Yorker's Malcolm Gladwell, and SUNY Oswego prof Ulises Mejias— downplayed the role of social media tools such as Twitter in protests like Egypt's. Others, though, countered with a relatively unified theme: It's not really about the media tools per se, but about the decentralized, hyperconnected network in which they are bound up. J-profs Jeremy Littau and Robert Hernandez, along with GigaOM's Mathew Ingram, wrote the most thoughtful versions of this theme, and they're all worth checking out, Bactrim Cost.

Tepid reviews for The Daily: Within the bubble of media geeks, one story dominated the others this week: On Wednesday, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. released The Daily, the first daily updated news publication produced specifically for the iPad. Bactrim photos, If you can't get enough coverage of The Daily, go check out Mediagazer's smorgasbord of links. I'll try to offer you a digestible (but still a bit overwhelming, I'll admit) summary of what people are saying about it.

Leading up to Wednesday's launch, Poynter's Damon Kiesow found many of the people who are working for the heretofore secretive publication, and media analyst Alan Mutter and All Things Digital's Peter Kafka examined the reasons why it might or might not take off. Bactrim Cost, Once the app was released Wednesday afternoon, the reviews came pouring in.

First, buy Bactrim online cod, the good: The first impressions of most of the digital experts polled by Poynter were positive, with several praising its visual design and one calling it "what I’ve always hoped newspapers would do with their tablet editions." PaidContent's Staci Cramer was generally complimentary, and The Guardian's Ian Betteridge gave it a (not terribly enthusiastic) "buy."

Most of the initial reviews, though, were not so kind. Much of the 'meh' was directed at lackluster content, Where can i find Bactrim online, as reviewer after reviewer expressed similar sentiments: "a general-interest publication that is not generally interesting" (The Columbia Journalism Review); "Murdoch’s reinvention of journalism looks a lot like the one before it" (Macworld); "fairly humdrum day-old stories that you might read in, well…a regular old printed newspaper" (Mathew Ingram); "little [of Murdoch's money], it appears, has been invested in editorial talent" (Mashable); "the Etch A Sketch edition of Us Magazine" (Alan Mutter); "barely brings digital journalism into the late 20th century, much less the 21st" (Mark Potts).

The bulk of that criticism seemed to be built on two foundational questions, asked by the Lab's Joshua Benton, which The Daily has apparently yet to answer convincingly: "Who is The Daily trying to reach, order Bactrim from mexican pharmacy. What problem is it trying to solve?" TechCrunch (and several of the above reviewers) asked similar questions, and GigaOM's Darrell Etherington attempted an answer, arguing that it's not for the obsessively-Twitter-checking news junkies, but iPad users struggling to adjust to life after newspapers.

A few other issues surrounding The Daily that drew attention: One was its separation from the web by virtue of its place within the proprietary iTunes Store and iPad, as well as the complete lack of links in or out, Bactrim Cost. (That hasn't stopped an authorized daily index of links to the web versions of articles from springing up, though.) Salon alum Scott Rosenberg and j-prof Dan Kennedy led the charge against the walled garden, Bactrim dosage, while the Lab's Megan Garber pointed out the draconian anti-aggregation language on The Daily's AP content, and Justin Ellis wondered how user engagement will work in that closed environment.

Then there were the economics of the publication: Media analyst Ken Doctor had two good sets of questions about what it will take for The Daily to financially succeed (the latter is more number-crunchy). Jeff Jarvis also looked at some possible numbers, and media consultant Amy Gahran chastised Murdoch for investing so much money in the venture. Gahran also looked at the hazards of dealing with Apple, and paidContent's Staci Kramer noted that Murdoch wants Apple to lower its share of the subscription revenue. Bactrim Cost, And on the News Corp. front, Bactrim alternatives, Slate's Jack Shafer wrote about the role Murdoch's impatience will play in its fate, and Subhub's Evan Radowski gave us a history lesson on News Corp. initiatives like this one.

Apple strikes against e-publishers: In its ongoing tightening of App Store access and regulations, Apple made a significant move this week by rejecting a Sony iPhone app that would have allowed users to buy e-books from the Sony Reader Store. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram did a great job of putting the decision in the context of Apple's past moves, No prescription Bactrim online, explaining why they make good business sense: "What’s the point of controlling a platform like the iPhone and the iPad if you can’t force people to pay you a carrying charge for hosting their content and connecting them with their customers?"

But others (even at GigaOM) were more skeptical. Jason Kincaid of TechCrunch said the decision underscores the downside of closed content platforms, and posited that it's the first shot in a war between Apple and Amazon's Kindle, and Slate's Farhad Manjoo urged Amazon to pull its Kindle app out of the App Store. In another widely expected move along the same lines, Apple also told publishers that within two months, any app that doesn't take payments through its iTunes Store would be rejected, Bactrim Cost.

AOL follows Demand's content-farming path: We talked last week about Demand Media's explosive IPO and Google's intention to make content farms harder to find in searches, and we have a couple of updates to those issues this week. First, Seamus McCauley of Virtual Economics explained why he's skeptical about Demand's true valuation, not to mention its accounting methods, doses Bactrim work. And while Google's algorithm limiting content farms is not yet live, search engine startup Blekko has banned many content farm domains, including Demand's eHow, from its search results. Meanwhile, the debate over Demand continued, Buy no prescription Bactrim online, with Adotas' Gavin Dunaway and MinnPost's John Reinan delivering this week's broadsides against the company. Bactrim Cost, AOL hasn't been talked about as a content farm too much as of yet, but that may change after Business Insider's publication this week of a leaked internal document called "The AOL Way," which reads a lot like the textbook content farm strategy guide. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram and Fortune's Dan Mitchell blasted the plan, with Ingram asserting that "the chasing of eyeballs and pageviews is a game of constantly diminishing returns." Martin Bryant of The Next Web, on the other hand, said AOL's model is not a misguided, diabolical plan, but "an inevitable, turbo-powered evolution of what’s happened in the media industry for many years."

Reading roundup: A few things to check out this weekend while you're most likely snowed in somewhere:

— This week's WikiLeaks update: Julian Assange sat down with 60 Minutes for an interview (there's also a video on what it took to make that happen), buy cheap Bactrim, WikiLeaks was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, The Guardian's Alan Rusbridger gave his own account about working with WikiLeaks, and NYU's Adam Penenberg made the case for Assange as a journalist. Reuters also profiled the new WikiLeaks spinoff OpenLeaks.

— A few paid-content notes: The New York Times isn't releasing details of its paywall plan just yet, but it is fixing technological glitches with the system right now, while Media Week reported that some industry analysts are skeptical of its chances. Meanwhile, the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News announced they'll start offering an e-edition to paying subscribers.

— GigaOM founder Om Malik wrote a simple but insightful guide to creating a successful consumer Internet service, focusing on three elements: A clear purpose, ease of use, and fun.

— Harvard prof David Weinberger has a short, thought-provoking post offering a 21st-century update on Marshall McLuhan's famous "The medium is the message" aphorism: "We are the medium." It's a simple idea, but it has some potentially profound implications, a few of which Weinberger begins to flesh out.

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October 4th, 2010

Bactrim Mg

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Bactrim Mg, on Oct. 1, 2010.]

AOL snaps up TechCrunch: The Internet giant of the '90s, AOL, has been aggressively trying to remake itself as a media company for the 2010s, and it made one of its biggest moves this week when it bought the influential tech blog TechCrunch. Get Bactrim, The deal was first reported by GigaOM and announced on stage Tuesday at TechCrunch's Disrupt conference. AOL also scooped up the web video company 5Min and Thing Labs, maker of the social media reader Brizzly on the same day, though it couldn't snatch the popular All Things Digital blogging crew away from The Wall Street Journal.

Given how central TechCrunch's founder, Michael Arrington, is to the blog's success, cheap Bactrim no rx, the first questions were twofold: Will Arrington be able to continue exercising his iconoclastic editorial voice with AOL, and can the blog remain strong if he leaves. Salon's Dan Gillmor was skeptical about the latter, and Fast Company and The Atlantic gave reason for similar doubts about the former, with a list of Arrington's past criticism of AOL and statements by the founder of Engadget, another blog purchased by AOL, that too many layers of management made the company difficult to work at, Bactrim Mg. (He said things have changed at AOL since then.) For his part, Arrington gave assurances to tech blogger Robert Scoble and TechCrunch's readers that he'll have complete editorial independence and has agreed to stay on for at least three years.

The bigger media issue, Buy Bactrim online cod, of course, is that this purchase signals AOL's deepening transformation into a full-on web media company. As a marketing exec told the New York Post's Keith Kelly, "Nobody gives AOL enough credit for the massive transformation that the brand has undertaken." AOL CEO Tim Armstrong explained the rationale behind the deal to Advertising Age and Bloomberg: TechCrunch's insider, consumer audience can garner premium ad rates, and the TechCrunch brand can give AOL some cred it couldn't necessarily get on its own. He also told GigaOM's Om Malik that he wants to begin developing platforms in communication, buy Bactrim without a prescription, content and advertising for other companies to build on, though he wouldn't go into details.

The Wall Street Journal threw a little bit of cold water on the AOL hype Bactrim Mg, , noting that more than 40 percent of the company's revenue still comes from dial-up Internet service and related subscriptions. Advertisers haven't totally bought into the change yet either, the Journal said. AOL might have come a long way, Where can i find Bactrim online, but it still has a long way to go, too.

Can social media produce real social change?: In a piece in this week's New Yorker, cultural critic Malcolm Gladwell challenged the idea that social media is an effective tool of social change and revolution, comparing it with the civil rights movement and other pre-social media large-scale social reform efforts. Gladwell argued that social media is built on weak social ties, which are good for encountering new information and amassing followers of a cause, Bactrim forum, but bad at inspiring collective action. "The evangelists of social media don’t understand this distinction; they seem to believe that a Facebook friend is the same as a real friend and that signing up for a donor registry in Silicon Valley today is activism in the same sense as sitting at a segregated lunch counter in Greensboro in 1960," Gladwell wrote, Bactrim Mg.

Gladwell expounded helpfully on his points in a chat on the New Yorker website, in which he said, among other things, that he holds up the 2008 Obama presidential campaign as the "gold standard" for social media-fueled civic engagement. Bactrim long term, His piece generated some thoughtful disagreement: The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal said he liked the article overall but took issue with Gladwell's assertion that online networks don't have leadership or organization.

Others weren't quite so complimentary: In a video conversation, politics professor Henry Farrell and the Cato Institute's Julian Sanchez agreed that social media's weak ties could make it easier to form the strong social ties that lead to significant action. A quasi-anonymous Economist correspondent made a similar arguments to both those points, saying that social media strengthens all social ties, and that networks' bottom-up nature make them particularly subversive. Jeff Sonderman made similar points as well Bactrim Mg, and pointed out that online and offline social networks tend to overlap, so they can't be treated as discrete entities.

There were plenty of other avenues (thoughtful and somewhat less so) down which critics took this debate — see this New York Times feature for six of them — but the most cogent points may have come from Expert Labs director Anil Dash, Bactrim alternatives, who argued that Gladwell is limited by his outmoded idea that the only type of revolutions that produce change are those that come in the form of chanting, sign-wielding masses. "There are revolutions, actual political and legal revolutions, that are being led online," Dash wrote. Buy Bactrim from mexico, "They're just happening in new ways, and taking subtle forms unrecognizable to those who still want a revolution to look like they did in 1965."

Helping hyperlocal news thrive: Many of the U.S.' hyperlocal-news pioneers gathered in Chicago late last week for the Block By Block Community News Summit hosted by the Knight Digital Media Center's Michele McLellan and NYU j-prof Jay Rosen. A variety of ideas, tips, anecdotes flew back and forth at the event, which was ably summarized by the Lab's Megan Garber as well as Lauren Kirchner of The Columbia Journalism Review and Polly Kreisman of the local-news blog Lost Remote. You can also check out videos of several of the sessions at the Reynolds Journalism Institute, Bactrim results.

Garber listed several of the main themes of the gathering: Developing an intimate connection with a community (something of a throwback role for the news media, Garber said), building advertising and branding, and finding ways to share ideas with each other, Bactrim Mg. Kirchner noted the common strain among the participants' description of their own situations: "I’ve figured out how to do this, but I don’t know how to make it last." She also noted the general tension in the room caused by the presence of representatives from AOL and Yahoo, two media companies with large-scale hyperlocal news aspirations. (Elsewhere this week, AOL’s hyperlocal Patch initiative was called the WalMart of news and a potential steamroller of hyperlocal startups, Order Bactrim online c.o.d, though The Batavian’s Howard Owens gave some tips on beating Patch in your own neighborhood.) Afterward, McLellan took stock of what hyperlocal journalists need next. Afterward, McLellan took stock of what hyperlocal journalists need next.

That wasn't the only hyperlocal news resource to emerge this week. J-Lab released a report detailing what's worked and what hasn't in the the five years it's been funding community-news startups. One major conclusion in the report is that  Bactrim Mg, hyperlocal news sites didn't replace the journalism of traditional news sources; they added something that hadn't been there before. (Some other key takeaways: Engagement, not just content; sweat equity is big; and the business model isn't there yet.) At Lost Remote, Bactrim treatment, Cory Bergman of Seattle's Next Door Media offered an endorsement of the report, adding that for his startup, "the biggest critical success factor for a neighborhood news site is a passionate editor." And at PBS Idea Lab, Martin Moore made the case for a bottom-up structure in local news sites.

Media trust hits a new low: Gallup released its annual poll on Americans' trust in the news media, Real brand Bactrim online, and in what's become a fairly regular occurrence, that trust is at an all-time low. MinnPost's David Brauer tried to square that finding with Pew's finding two weeks ago that people are spending more time with the news. (My guess: Gallup's survey measures feelings about the traditional news media, while Pew's finding of increased news consumption is attributable largely to new media sources.)

The Atlantic's Derek Thompson asked why trust is so low, and came up with an interesting hypothesis: The news media is telling us not to trust the news media. Citing Bill O'Reilly, Glenn Beck and Jon Stewart as examples, he concludes, "to consume opinion journalism ... is to consume a product that exists to tell you that the product is inherently rotten." As if on cue, the Los Angeles Times' Andrew Malcolm rattled off a sarcastic litany of things the media has done to confirm people's belief that it's biased, Bactrim Mg.

Reading roundup: Before we get the miscellany, is Bactrim addictive, there were a few smaller news developments that I want to highlight this week:

— The Boston Globe announced that it's planning on splitting its websites into free and paid versions late next year. (The Globe is owned by The New York Times Co., and The Times is also planning to charge for its website next year.) Media analyst Ken Doctor wrote a smart analysis on the Globe's strategy, calling it a plan to retain its print readers in the short run and convert them to (paid) tablet reading in the long run. The alt-weekly Boston Phoenix, Taking Bactrim, meanwhile, didn't waste time in writing Boston.com's obituary.

— Mayhill Fowler, who gave The Huffington Post one of its biggest-ever scoops in 2008 as a reporter for the Off the Bus citizen-journalism project, wrote a kiss-off post on her personal blog announcing she was leaving the site, essentially, because she was tired of writing for nothing. The Post fired back Bactrim Mg, , and Politico's Ben Smith used the incident to wonder if the opinion-oriented blogosphere is moving toward news judgment as the mainstream media makes the opposite transition.

— After Forbes bought his freelance blogging network True/Slant, Lewis D'Vorkin is planning on selling blog space to advertisers alongside the company's news blogs, Advertising Age reported. Reuters' Felix Salmon predicted the plan would spur a uprising along the lines of ScienceBlogs' PepsiGate this summer.

Now the three stray pieces you need to take a look at:

— The Awl's Nick Douglas wrote a great post explaining why online forums are so underrated as online culture-drivers, and why Reddit is becoming more important within that subculture.

— Stanford scholar Geoff McGhee produced a fantastic set of videos on data journalism. Regardless of whether you're familiar with data journalism, this is a must-see, Bactrim Mg.

— And possibly the most essential piece of the week: Jonathan Stray's case for designing journalism from the user's perspective. "The news experience needs to become intensely personal," Stray wrote. "It must be easy for users to find and follow exactly their interests, no matter how arcane. Journalists need to get proficient at finding and engaging the audience for each story." A quote doesn't do it justice; go read the whole thing.

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September 14th, 2010

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[This post was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Flagyl Over The Counter, on Aug. 20, 2010.]

Patch's big hyperlocal news play: AOL's hyperlocal news project, Patch, launched a site in Morristown, New Jersey, this week — not a big story by itself, but Morristown's site was also the 100th in Patch's network, Flagyl overnight, part of the Internet giant's plan to expand to 500 hyperlocal news sites by the end of the year. Newark's Star-Ledger and NPR both profiled AOL's hyperlocal efforts, with The Star-Ledger focusing on its extensive New Jersey experiment and NPR looking more at the broader picture of hyperlocal news.

PaidContent added some fascinating details from Patch president Warren Webster, such as the tidbit that Patch determines what communities to enter by using a 59-variable algorithm that takes into account factors like income, voter turnout, Flagyl from canadian pharmacy, and local school rankings. And Advertising Age's Edmund Lee compared Patch with several of its large-scale-content rivals, finding it most closely comparable to Philip Anschutz's Examiner.com.

As Steve Safran of the local-news blog Lost Remote noted, Patch is hiring 500 journalists to run those sites and is touting itself as the nation's largest hirer of journalists right now, Flagyl Over The Counter. That, of course, is good news for people who care about journalism, but the far bigger issue is whether Patch will be financially sustainable. Safran was skeptical, Flagyl reviews, arguing that Patch needs relevant local advertising, which requires not just reach but relationships. The Boston Phoenix found several other people who also wonder about Patch's long-term prospects. Ken Doctor asked some good questions about Patch's implications for local news, including whether it will disrupt the handcrafted local ad networks that have been the domain of non-templated startup local news blogs.

Facebook is officially going Places Flagyl Over The Counter, : Facebook made a long-anticipated announcement Wednesday, rolling out its new location-based service, Facebook Places. It's all the tech blogs have been talking about since then, Flagyl schedule, so there's plenty to wade through if you're interested in all the details, but Search Engine Land did a good job of discussing the basics of the service and its implications. It made one particularly salient point, given that Facebook has partnered with all of the leading location-based services (FoursquareGowallaBooyah and Yelp): Location check-ins have officially become a commodity, and location services need to expand beyond it. (It also means, Flagyl brand name, to borrow Clay Shirky's point, that location-based technology is about to get socially interesting, since it's quickly becoming technologically boring.)

Facebook isn't yet doing anything to drive revenue from Places, but Lost Remote's Cory Bergman noted that Places' inevitable widespread acceptance could "usher in a new era of local advertising" when Facebook incorporates proximity-based advertising. Facebook is already paving the way for that shift, asking advertisers to help fill out its directory of places. Fast Company's Kit Eaton took a deeper look at how Facebook Places will change location-based advertising, though Terry Heaton called Facebook Places' revenue potential a missed opportunity for local news organizations, Flagyl Over The Counter. Flagyl treatment, Despite Facebook's preemptive privacy defense with Places — by default, check-ins are only visible to friends and can be limited further than that — it still faced some privacy pushback. Several privacy advocates argued that people are going to have a difficult time finding ways to control their privacy on sharing locations, and the ACLU said that once again, Facebook is making it much easier to say "yes" to Places than "no." One of those advocates, dotRights, provided a guide to Facebook Places privacy settings.

Is the web really dead?: In its most recent cover story, Flagyl no prescription, Wired magazine declared the web dead, with its editor, Chris Anderson, arguing that in our quest for portability and ease of use, we've moved into an app-centered world led by Apple, Facebook, Flagyl dangers, Twitter, RSS, Netflix and Pandora. The result, Anderson said, is that we now prefer "semiclosed platforms that use the Internet for transport but not the browser for display," a universe not ruled by Google and HTML. Flagyl Over The Counter, Not surprisingly, such a sweeping statement was met with quite a bit of resistance. Web luminaries Tim O'Reilly and John Battelle dived into the arcane in their lengthy disagreement with Anderson, Flagyl wiki, while plenty of others across the web also had problems with his decree of death. BoingBoing's Rob Beschizza provided the most cogent statistical argument, showing that while Anderson depicts the web as decreasing in the percentage of Internet use, Flagyl natural, its total use is still exploding. Terry Heaton and TechCrunch's Michael Arrington argued that the web still functions well and serves as the basis for many of the "apps" Anderson makes his argument from, with Heaton positing that Wired (and Apple) are still operating on a set of scarcity-based presumptions in a world now defined by abundance. Gawker's Ryan Tate noted that Wired first released its article on its profitable website, while sales of its iPad app are down.

Quite a few others took issue with the idea of declaring things dead in the first place. ReadWriteWeb and Technologizer tallied lists of very much alive things that were long ago declared dead, and The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal criticized Anderson's view that tech is "just a series of increasingly awesomer things that successively displace each other" as long ago proven wrong. Here at the Lab, Jason Fry made a similar point, pointing out that, "the web isn’t dying but being joined by a lot of other contact points between the user and the sea of digital information, with points emerging for different settings, situations, and times of day."

Murdoch's tablet newspaper plan: The Los Angeles Times reported late last week that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, Flagyl Over The Counter. is developing a new national U.S. "digital newspaper" distributed solely as a paid app on tablets like the iPad, kjøpe Flagyl på nett, köpa Flagyl online. The publication would compete with papers like USA Today and The New York Times, would feature short, easily digestible stories for a general audience, and its newsroom would be run under The New York Post. Murdoch said he sees this as a "game changer" in the news industry's efforts to reach younger audiences, but news industry vet Alan Mutter was skeptical: "Newspaper content tends to attract — whether on print or on an iPad or however — mostly the same kind of readers, Flagyl mg, " Mutter told the Times. Flagyl Over The Counter, "Not necessarily younger readers."

Mutter wasn't the only dubious one. Murdoch biographer/gadfly Michael Wolff ripped the idea, and TechCrunch's Paul Carr notedthat News Corp. tried a similar idea in Britain in 2006 for free, and that bombed. This idea, Carr said, "reflects less a bold strategy to convince a new generation of readers that good journalism is worth paying for and more the 79-year News Corp proprietor’s desperation to keep the cash flow coming until the company’s profitability becomes someone else’s problem."

Drawing on a survey of iPad users, cheap FlagylMario Garcia said that Murdoch's plan for quick, snappy stories doesn't fit well with the iPad's primary role as a relaxing device. At least one person was encouraged by Murdoch's idea: Missouri j-prof Clyde Bentley, who called it the cannon shot that will scare the herd of newspaper executives into seriously pursuing mobile media.

News Corp. also made news by donating $1 million to the Republican Governors Association. I'll leave most of the analysis of this move to the politically oriented media critics, though media consultant Ken Doctor outlined a good case for the gift's importance in the journalism world, Flagyl Over The Counter. We also got a report that Murdoch's British tabloid News of the World will go paid online by October. The Guardian's Roy Greenslade wasn't impressed by that initiative's prospects for success. Flagyl without prescription,

Reading roundup: Lots and lots to get to this week. In the spirit of Rupert Murdoch, I'll keep it short and snappy:

— The fallout from last week's Google-Verizon proposal continued into the weekend, with both watchdogs and Google allies raising concerns about the future of net neutrality. Harvard Internet law professor Jonathan Zittrain had plenty more thoughtful things Flagyl Over The Counter, to say about the flap, and  The Wall Street Journal had a lengthy interview with Google CEO Eric Schmidt about that issue and several others.

— We got some discouraging news from a couple of surveys released this week: Gallup found that Americans' trust in traditional news organizations remains historically low, while a comScore study found that (surprise!) even young news junkies don't read newspapers. Each study had a silver lining, though — Gallup found that young people's trust in newspapers is far higher than any other age group, order Flagyl from United States pharmacy, and comScore showed that many young non-print readers are still consuming lots of news online. Here at the Lab, Christopher Sopher wrote a sharp two-part series on attracting young would-be news consumers.

— Google's Lyn Headley is continuing his series of articles explaining the new Rapid News Awards, and each one is a smart analysis of the nature of aggregation and authority. They've all been worth checking out.

— Two great resources on interesting trends within journalism: The Lab's video of a discussion among a who's who of nonprofit journalism leaders on the form's sustainability, and Poynter's Mallary Jean Tenore's article on the encouraging resurgence of long-form journalism in its online form.

— Finally, Florida j-prof Mindy McAdams sparked a great discussion about what skills are necessary for today's reporter. If you're a college student or a budding reporter (or even a veteran one), give this conversation a close read.

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March 20th, 2010

This Week in Review: Loads of SXSW ideas, Pew’s state of the news, and a dire picture of local TV news