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August 13th, 2011

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[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Buy Retin A No Prescription, on Aug. 12, 2011.]

Murdoch passes Wall Street's test: The fallout from News Corp.'s phone hacking scandal continued to spread this week, with the reported arrest of another former News of the World editor and the report that the ostensibly fired News Corp. British chief, Rebekah Brooks, Retin A alternatives, is still on the company payroll.

Three weeks after testifying before Parliament, Rupert Murdoch faced Wall Street analysts this week in a conference call, telling them that he's not going anywhere and that the scandal hasn't done any material damage to the company outside of News of the World. Purchase Retin A, All Things Digital's Peter Kafka said Wall Street really doesn't care about the hacking, and Murdoch didn't say much about the few questions he did get on it.

Murdoch also had to meet with News Corp.'s board, but as the New York Times' Jeremy Peters reported, the board's officially independent members include numerous people who have deep personal ties to Murdoch, Buy Retin A No Prescription. Perhaps more troubling was a different connection among one of the board members: According to Time's Massimo Calabresi, one of them is "best friends" with the district attorney leading the U.S. investigation into the company.

The Times' David Carr uncovered more hints at News Corp.'s enormous political influence here in the States, Retin A pics, detailing cases of swift approval of a merger by a Justice Department unit led by a future News Corp. executive, as well as a suspiciously dropped federal criminal case. "The company’s size and might give it a soft, less obvious power that it has been able to project to remarkable effect, Buy Retin A without prescription, " Carr concluded. Buy Retin A No Prescription, At Adweek, Murdoch biographer Michael Wolff went further, reporting that the Justice Department is considering investigating News Corp. on racketeering charges, though Forbes' Jeff Bercovici doubted that would happen. For a bit more info on the situation, here's a good Q&A with Nick Davies, the Guardian reporter who's been all over the story, order Retin A no prescription.

AOL's slap from investors: This week hasn't been a good one for AOL: After it reported a quarterly loss on Tuesday, its stock dropped by about a quarter by the end of the day. All Things Digital's Peter Kafka gave a quick explainer of why investors are so down on AOL: What little money they're making isn't coming from the all-important display advertising business. Mathew Ingram of GigaOM added more depth to that analysis, arguing that investors are doubting AOL's assurances that its two big gambles — Patch and the acquisition of the Huffington Post — will pay off, Buy Retin A No Prescription.

According to AOL CEO Tim Armstrong (paraphrased by Business Insider), Retin A price, coupon, the reason for those problems is that AOL's advertising side hasn't scaled well enough. Peter Kafka explained that AOL's advertising (especially display) is indeed up, though much of that can be attributed to the HuffPo and TechCrunch acquisitions. Forbes' Jeff Bercovici said AOL's public image problem has even damaged the previously successful HuffPo, quoting an analyst who called AOL a "dead brand." Wired's Tim Carmody decided to unite our two big stories this week and suggested that AOL would be a perfect fit for a purchase by News Corp.

Meanwhile's AOL's local-news initiative, Retin A samples, Patch, launched a Groupon-esque daily deal service, and Iowa grad student Robert Gutsche Jr.questioned Patch's standards for separating journalism and advertising — and got the runaround from Patch when he asked them about it. AOL's new daily tablet magazine, Editions, Buying Retin A online over the counter,  also drew some criticism, with Fast Company's Austin Carr perturbed that it's not AOL-y enough.

A news org gets into tablets Buy Retin A No Prescription, : We've already seen numerous challengers to the iPad's early stranglehold on the tablet marketplace, but the Tribune Co. might be the first news company to try one out. CNN's Mark Milian reported that the newspaper chain is working on an Android-based tablet, which it's planning on offering it for free or very cheap to people who sign up for extended newspaper subscriptions. It's already missed a mid-August deadline for testing the tablet out, purchase Retin A online.

Media pundits didn't think much of the Tribune's idea. Wired's Tim Carmody urged the Tribune (and media companies in general) to quit developing tablets, arguing that it's way too hard to do if you're a major development company, let alone a news organization. "If major publishers are seriously prepared to blow up their primary revenue stream — print advertising — and slap together a giveaway tablet in order to save money on ink, God help them," he wrote, Buy Retin A No Prescription.

Others echoed Carmody's arguments: PaidContent's Tom Crazit called the project "a colossal waste of money for a company trying to emerge from bankruptcy." Chris Velazco of TechCrunch said the cheap-tablet model (also being talked about by Philadelphia Newspapers) isn't viable. Gizmodo's Brent Rose was less restrained: "WHY??" Morris Communications' Steve Yelvington was a little kinder to the Tribune, saying the numbers might add up, Kjøpe Retin A på nett, köpa Retin A online, but the devil's in the details.

The Times gets experimental: The New York Times has frequently made strong pushes into news innovation over the past several years, and this week it started another one, launching a new public test kitchen for projects in development. The Lab's Megan Garber explained what the site, beta620, Retin A for sale, is all about, but GigaOM's Mathew Ingram, while applauding the effort, expressed some doubt about whether the Times is really capable of developing a startup's mindset. Buy Retin A No Prescription, Tim Carmody of Wired, on the other hand, said the startup analogy isn't the right one for the Times. Retin A online cod, With these projects, he said, "The New York Times has become an openly experimental public institution. It’s less a cathedral consecrated to its own past than a free museum where patrons are invited to touch and transform everything they see." Poynter's Jeff Sonderman had some suggestions for next steps for the Times to take with beta620: experimenting with design, getting away from the long narrative article, and rethinking comments, Retin A trusted pharmacy reviews.

The real-name debate: One long-simmering debate I want to briefly catch you up on: Google+ has decided to take the Facebook route of disallowing pseudonyms, adjusting but reaffirming its policy in the face of online criticism late last month and again on Thursday. The outcry continued, voiced most prominently late last week by social media researcher danah boyd, Order Retin A from mexican pharmacy, who asserted that "'real names' policies aren’t empowering; they’re an authoritarian assertion of power over vulnerable people."

Liz Gannes of All Things Digital said she understands Google's motivations for enforcing real names and unifying everything under its umbrella within the same identity, but the idea of doing the latter is awkward at best and frightening at worst. The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal, meanwhile, announced he's changed his mind against real-name policies, arguing that requiring real names online is a radical departure from the relationship between speech and identity in the offline world, Buy Retin A No Prescription.

Reading roundup: A few other things to keep an eye on this week:

— Amazon released a version of its Kindle app for browsers, called the Kindle Cloud Reader. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram said the browser-based e-book app (which bypasses Apple's restrictions) could be a roadmap for the future of the web, but Wired's Tim Carmody said it still doesn't get the web, Retin A without prescription.

— Google announced it's making its hand-chosen Editors' Picks a standing feature on Google News. The Lab's Megan Garber explained what Google's doing with it. Buy Retin A No Prescription, Meanwhile, James Gleick at The New York Review of Books offered a thoughtful piece on Google's domination of our online lives.

— Adweek explained an underrated obstacle to innovation and progress in news organizations' online efforts: the intractable CMS.

— Steve Buttry, now with the Journal Register Co., gave his lessons from TBD's demise on the Washington local news site's first birthday. It's short but solid. Enjoy.

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August 13th, 2011

Flagyl Mg

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Flagyl Mg, on Aug. 5, 2011.]

How right do we need to be on Twitter?: It's not particularly uncommon for false information to spread on Twitter under the guise of breaking news, and that's what happened late last week, when several journalists spread the rumor that CNN's Piers Morgan had been suspended from his show as part of the fallout from News Corp.'s phone hacking scandal, which turned out to be untrue. Flagyl description, This misinformation, however, led to the most interesting discussion on Twitter and accuracy we've seen in a while.

It started with Reuters' Felix Salmon, one of those who tweeted the Morgan rumor, defending the practice of quickly tweeting breaking news (false, in some cases) and then quickly correcting it, is Flagyl safe. "Twitter is more like a newsroom than a newspaper: it’s where you see news take shape. Rumors appear and die; stories come into focus; people talk about what’s true and what’s false," he wrote. While news organizations' official accounts should stick to confirmed reports, individual reporters should be able to tweet unconfirmed information, Salmon said, as long as they attribute it properly and correct it quickly, Flagyl Mg.

Several writers objected to this line of reasoning: Fishbowl NY's Chris O'Shea said Salmon should be committed to tweeting true information because the fact that he's seen as a credible news source is the reason people follow him on Twitter in the first place. The Columbia Journalism Review's Dean Starkman countered that Twitter is much closer to publishing than a newsroom meeting: "The reason people feel a bit of embarrassment after making a mistake on Twitter is precisely because it’s so public." And Rem Rieder of the American Journalism Review said Salmon's strategy constitutes a reckless disregard for reporters' individual brand and reputation.

Others were more sympathetic to Salmon's point. Mathew Ingram of GigaOM pushed back against Rieder, Flagyl no prescription, arguing that news is a process, not just the publication of a finished product, and Twitter is part of that process. Salmon's editor at Reuters Flagyl Mg, , Anthony DeRosa, who also tweeted the Morgan rumor, agreed with Salmon that Twitter is a newsroom, but vowed to be more careful to tweet verified information. The Journal Register Co.'s Steve Buttry, meanwhile, said that the dichotomy between being first and being right is a false one for journalists — and that journalists should strive for both.

A new tool for the new newsroom: Chartbeat, taking Flagyl, which does real-time analytics for websites, launched a news-oriented version of its tool last week called Newsbeat. Poynter's Jeff Sonderman put together a good overview of the service, which includes more detail about traffic trends and sources than Chartbeat. In an interview with GigaOM's Mathew Ingram, Discount Flagyl, Chartbeat's Tony Haile answered the objection that this type of data will just lead to a "tyranny of the popular," arguing instead that the service may instead show journalists how they're underestimating their audiences, or how they can repackage news stories to make them more understandable to readers.

The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal provided an example from his own experience, noting that Chartbeat has shown that a surprising number of offbeat longform stories there generate big traffic, Flagyl Mg. Newsbeat, he said, could help the mass of news sources fighting for attention online each find their sweet spot. "I love analytics because I owe them my ability to write weird stories on the Internet, where can i find Flagyl online," he said.

At Wired, Tim Carmody emphasized the real-time nature of the information, noting that the need for that kind of information is growing as news organizations are increasingly editing and publishing in real time, too. Order Flagyl from United States pharmacy, Here at the Lab, Megan Garber was intrigued by the fact that Newsbeat offers individualized dashboards for each writer and editor's content. Flagyl Mg, The feature, she reasoned, demonstrates the increased encouragement of entrepreneurialism within the modern newsroom: "Increasingly, the gates of production are swinging open to journalists throughout, if not fully across, the newsroom. That’s a good thing. It’s also a big thing. And Newsbeat is reflecting it."

A truly daily tablet publication: Seems almost every other week we have a new entry into the tablet news market; this week it's AOL, which launched its daily tablet magazine Editions this week. All Things Digital and Poynter have good overviews of what the new publication is: Notably, generic Flagyl, it's delivered to your tablet just once a day (at the time of your choosing), with a set ending page, and without any updates. It's big on personalization, tailoring news to each user a bit like Pandora, and it also includes some local news and, as Poynter noted, primarily aims to recreate the print experience (a fake mailing label, even!), Flagyl Mg.

To the people behind Editions, its lack of updates and finite, Flagyl results, print-like interface are assets: As one of them told the New York Times, "For a lot of people, [continual updating] becomes oppressive. This is not tapping you on the shoulder all the time." But at TechCrunch (which is also owned by AOL), Erick Schonfeld was skeptical, asserting that if he feels like he's getting day-old news on Editions, he'll just stick to the web, online buying Flagyl hcl. "News apps need to be as current as the Web. Those are just table stakes," he wrote. Mashable's Lauren Indvik, on the other hand, was rather impressed, Flagyl without a prescription, saying the finiteness of the magazine provides a nice contrast to the unruliness of the web.

The scandal goes stateside Flagyl Mg, : A couple of updates on the News Corp. phone hacking scandal: The story is beginning to migrate across the Atlantic, as attention begins to shift toward several accusations of spying made years ago against News Corp. holdings in the United States. Nick Davies, where can i buy cheapest Flagyl online, the Guardian reporter who broke this story open earlier this summer, was reportedly in the States this week investigating News Corp. At New York magazine, Frank Rich urged Americans to look more closely into Murdoch's behavior here: "We’ve become so inured to Murdoch tactics over the years—and so many people in public life have been frightened, silenced, Flagyl forum, co-opted, or even seduced by them—that we have minimized his impact exactly the way his publicists hoped we would, downgrading News Corp. misbehavior merely to tabloid vulgarity and right-wing attack-dog politics."

Two other notes: The News Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal is surveying subscribers about its image in light of the phone hacking scandal, and the American Journalism Review's John Morton said that for all his faults, Rupert Murdoch's heart is in newspapers, something he appreciates, Flagyl Mg.

Reading roundup: Several things journalists and educators might find useful this week:

— Some smaller papers in the Lee Enterprises chain are going to be trying out metered-model online pay plans, which include a small charge for the website even for print subscribers. Poynter's Rick Edmonds explained why. And at the Lab, buy generic Flagyl, Ken Doctor looked at how the economics of circulation and advertising are moving online.

— There are still a few places where print is still king — among the wealthy, for instance, as data from this Ad Age survey show.

— A few great how-to's and suggestions: Journalism.co.uk's SEO primer for journalists; Florida j-prof Mindy McAdams' six proposals for journalism education; and a quick guide to data journalism from the Guardian. Flagyl dangers, — Finally, media analyst Alan Mutter made a strong case for why newspapers' business model will never stabilize and urged them to begin "intelligently, and speedily, de-stabilizing their enterprises." It's a case that's been made many times before, but one that probably needs to be heard again.

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July 9th, 2011

Cipro For Sale

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Cipro For Sale, on June 24, 2011.]

The New York Post's iPad block: News Corp. head Rupert Murdoch has developed a reputation for draconian policies toward paid content and the web, and he furthered that pattern this week when News Corp.'s New York Post blocked access to its website from the iPad's Safari browser in an effort to sell more of its iPad apps. A subscription to the app runs $6.99 per month; access to the website would be free.

The reaction on the web was overwhelmingly negative: Tech pioneer Dave Winer accused the Post of "breaking the web," paidContent's Staci Kramer called it "one of the most poorly conceived paywall efforts I’ve come across, buy Cipro from mexico," and business journalist Adam Tinworth called the move "dictatorial." As Kramer and Examiner.com's Michael Santo noted, the Post left plenty of workarounds for users who don't want to pay up, through alternative browsers like Skyfire. Kramer and Engadget's Dana Wollman also suspected that Murdoch is attempting to recreate the Post as an app-based tabloid like his other major effort, Cipro reviews, The Daily. (Both are skeptical about the prospects of that plan.)

News Corp, Cipro For Sale. does have some good news on the iPad front this week, though: The Post and The Daily are the two highest-grossing publishing apps on the iPad, ranking well ahead of the next-most-lucrative apps — two comic-book apps and Conde Nast's New Yorker and Wired.

Poynter's Regina McCombs talked to three other iPad app publishers — CNN, the Greensboro (N.C.) News & Record, Cipro trusted pharmacy reviews, and Better Homes & Gardens — about how they put their apps together. And the Columbia Journalism Review's Zachary Sniderman compared the iPad's adoption process to that of print periodicals before it: The iPad's sales, he said, "mirror a long trend of historical adoption rates and cultural attitudes: initial enthusiasm for a new platform, Online Cipro without a prescription, slow adoption, and then gradually increasing sales as the population gets habituated to using the new technology."

A fresh round of news innovation: This week was a big one in news innovation, as the Knight Foundation (one of the Lab's funders) announced the 16 winners of the last round of its five-year Knight News Challenge competition. The Lab's Joshua Benton gave a good annotated roundup of the winning entries, which will get a total of $4.7 million: There are a few names many people will recognize, including former New York Times/ProPublica project DocumentCloud, Cipro images, the AP's (and the Lab's) Jonathan Stray, and the crisis text-mapping service Ushahidi. Cipro For Sale, I would expect profiles of several of the winning projects over the next week or so, and the Lab's Justin Ellis provided the first with a look at the Chicago Tribune's PANDA, which aims to help newsrooms analyze data more easily. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram noticed the data journalism theme running through the winning entries, and elsewhere, Where can i buy cheapest Cipro online, the Daily Dot's Nicholas White opined on the importance of data in journalism.

Benton's post also included a glance at what's next for the News Challenge, as well as highlights of what has and hasn't gone well over the News Challenge's short history from a recently released internal review. Some of the main challenges: Underestimated difficulty of citizen journalism and news game projects, problems with accurate cost budgeting, and a slow timetable, Cipro forum. Poynter's Jeff Sonderman also looked back at some of the lessons learned from the News Challenge.

The Knight Foundation also announced a three-year, $3.76 million investment in MIT's Center for Future Civic Media, which named Berkman Center researcher Ethan Zuckerman its new director, Cipro For Sale. The Lab's Andrew Phelps talked to Zuckerman about where the center is headed, and Zuckerman looked at his goals in a post of his own. Mathew Ingramwondered whether the center can help with the ongoing reinvention of local journalism. Japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal,

Two legal wins for aggregators: Rulings were handed down this week in two cases that probably only media-law nerds have following, but both have big implications for online news aggregation and link journalism. In the first case, a federal court ruled that a financial site can publish analysts' stock tips immediately, a blow to a legal principle called the "hot news doctrine" that protects certain facts ("hot news") from being republished for a short period of time. (Here's a great explainer Cipro For Sale, of the case from last year.)

This was one of those rulings where everyone declares victory: The court actually upheld the validity of the hot news doctrine in the Internet/aggregation era, but said it didn't apply in this case — the analysts are newsmakers and the website is the news breaker, the judge wrote. As Dealbook noted, Cipro pictures, the lawyer for Google and Twitter (who filed anti-hot news doctrine briefs) called it "a great decision for the free flow of information in the new media age," while the pro-hot news AP called it "a victory for the news media and the public." But as paidContent's Joe Mullin argued, it looks as though this decision will ultimate weaken the hot news doctrine.

In the other case, Where to buy Cipro, the copyright enforcement firm Righthaven had its lawsuit on behalf of the Las Vegas Review-Journal dismissed. Righthaven had sued a message-board user for reposting a 19-paragraph Review-Journal editorial, but the judge ruled that the posting was protected under fair use because the editorial only contained five paragraphs of purely original opinions and because it was posted for noncommercial reasons.

A renewed debate over anonymity: There have been a handful of streams of discussion regarding anonymity online over the past few weeks that converged a bit this week, and I thought it might be helpful to summarize a couple of them briefly for you. Two weeks ago, a supposed lesbian blogger in Syria was unmasked as a middle-aged American grad student, prompting thoughtful responses from people like the Berkman Center's Ethan Zuckerman and on the role of participatory media and the Guardian's Dan Gillmor and the Berkman Center's Jillian York on the continued need for anonymity, Cipro For Sale.

And last week, discount Cipro, a couple photographed kissing in the streets amid riots in Vancouver was identified online and making the mainstream-media rounds within days, prompting questions about the end of anonymity by writers like the New York Times' Brian Stelter and Salon's Drew Grant. Meanwhile, former NPR ombudsman Alicia Shepard decried anonymous online commenting, Cipro maximum dosage, calling it "faux democracy" and urging news organizations to require commenters to use their real names.

GigaOM's Mathew Ingram drew on several of those developments to echo Gillmor's and York's defenses of anonymity, arguing that it's been a key part of healthy democracy, allowing people to speak to the powerful without fear of reprisal. (The AP's Jonathan Stray called it "the digital analog of right to free assembly.") "We shouldn’t toss that kind of principle aside so lightly just because we want to cut down on irritating comments from readers, or stop the occasional blogger from pretending to be someone they are not, buy Cipro from canada," Ingram wrote.

Reading roundup Cipro For Sale, : Here's what else happened at the intersection of journalism and technology this week:

— Outgoing New York Times executive editor Bill Keller, who's done a fair amount of Twitter-tweaking over the past month or so, gave an interview to Reuters in which he said the idea that he's opposed to social media is a misconception. But sociologist Zeynep Tufekci took issue with his idea that social media use leads to less time with "real-life" friends, and when Keller asked for evidence, she let him have it. Cipro price, The Knight Digital Media Center's Amy Gahran also defended social media's usefulness to journalists with some new Pew data.

— This Week in AOL: Two more former employees gave their own horror stories about working there — one a writer, the other from sales. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong also said he's considering paid content as part of the company's continued revamp, the Columbia Journalism Review's Ryan Chittum pondered the AOL Way and the journalistic "hamster wheel," and Poynter's Steve Myers said comparisons between the Huffington Post and the New York Times are unfounded, Cipro dangers.

— Another potential player in the ongoing long-form nonfiction renaissance, Byliner, launched this week. The Lab and Poynter ran previews.

— Finally, the interesting pieces on the FCC's recent report on the future of local news continue to trickle out. Here's a pointed analysis by the folks at Free Press and a two-part Columbia Journalism Review interview with the report's lead writer, Steven Waldman.

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July 9th, 2011

Diflucan Dosage

[This review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Diflucan Dosage, on June 10, 2011.]


Apple’s mobile Newsstand is a reality: When Steve Jobs makes an announcement, it’s a pretty good bet that whatever he introduces will be what the media-tech world is talking about for the next week (or month, or year). On Monday, Jobs had plenty to introduce — led by a new Mac operating system (Lion), mobile operating system (iOS 5), and a new cloud service to replace MobileMe (iCloud). Those developments have implications for several different aspects of news and media, Diflucan mg, and I’ll try to run down as many of them as I can.


The most direct impact will likely come from Newsstand, an app Jobs unveiled that will be similar to iBooks, providing a single place for all of a user’s magazine and newspaper app subscriptions.


TechCrunch called it evidence that Apple is emphasizing that the iPad is for reading, while GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram and the Guardian’s Jemima Kiss saw a trade-off for publishers: A simpler subscription interface (which likely means more renewals), but even more control for Apple. For consumers, as the Lab’s Andrew Phelps and Megan Garber noted, purchase Diflucan online no prescription, it’s the closest digital publishing has come to the traditional distribution model of regular home delivery.


Apple’s new operating systems will include a raft of upgrades, many of which overlap with existing third-party apps. The New York Times’ Bits blog has a good breakdown of what apps might be threatened, led by the reading-list creator Instapaper, as Apple will begin offering a similar basic function as part of Safari. Instapaper founder Marco Arment was understandably perturbed by the news, but later reasoned that the upgrade could make saving things to read later a built-in part of the workflow of millions of Apple users — and that if even a small percentage of them want a deluxe version of that service, Instapaper will still be in fine shape. The point was echoed by The Next Web’s Matthew Panzarino and by Andrew and Megan here at the Lab.



Apple eases up — kind of: Apple made another significant change this week, too, this one without an announcement, Diflucan Dosage. Order Diflucan online c.o.d, As MacRumors discovered yesterday, Apple quietly adjusted its policy on in-app subscriptions, allowing publishers to sell in-app subscriptions for whatever price they want (previously, they had to be at least as cheap as app subscriptions outside Apple’s store) and lifting the requirement that subscriptions must be offered within the app itself.


All Things Digital’s Peter Kafka has a good explanation of the change, noting that Apple may be allowing companies to circumvent its App Store, but it’s not going to let it be easy. (You still can’t, for example, Diflucan without a prescription, include in your app a “Buy” button pointing users to subscribe via your website.) Still, the lifting of the price restriction could be an encouragement for publishers because, as paidContent’s Staci Kramer pointed out, now they can raise prices to absorb Apple’s 30% revenue cut.


But that doesn’t mean publishers will end up taking advantage of their newfound freedoms. The Lab’s Joshua Benton argued that most publishers won’t, Rx free Diflucan, because customers will resist varied app prices and because Apple’s app purchasing system offers some significant value to publishers that might be worth its 30% cut. And media analyst Ken Doctor reminded us that Apple still holds just about all the cards in this hand.


Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman made an interesting observation: Apple seems to be using the adjusted guidelines to funnel app subscriptions into its new Newsstand. Newsstand’s likely prominence still leaves plenty of open questions for publishers (including the ones outlined earlier), Sonderman said.



The Financial Times hedges its bets on Apple: One publisher stated quite emphatically this week that it’s not going to play Apple’s game: The Financial Times unveiled a mobile web app intended as an alternative to Apple’s App Store-based apps.


By using an HTML5-based app, the FT can design a single app for any major mobile device and get around Apple’s 30 percent cut of app subscriptions, but its apps may get pulled from the App Store. Diflucan Dosage, (The next day, the FT responded to Apple’s new guidelines with what sounded like indignation, sounding as though they’ll charge forward.)


An FT exec told the Guardian that the app was something of a line in the sand, resulting from what he called a “Mexican standoff” with Apple. The move was heralded as a critical one in the tug-of-war between Apple and publishers: All Things Digital called it the first attempt by a major news org to create an HTML5 app that feels just like an App Store app, Diflucan street price, and paidContent said the move was “significant and brave,” especially since its Apple-native apps have been so successful.


Bobbie Johnson of GigaOM wondered if this would be the catalyst news orgs need to start standing up to Apple, and Ken Doctor said the FT’s main value would be in providing a counterweight to the Apple-centric market, as well as experiments for other news orgs to learn from. Benedict Evans, Diflucan cost, meanwhile, said the FT may have a dedicated readership to pull this off where other news orgs can’t.


There were a few voices pushing back against the “FT goes to war with Apple” narrative: Noting that the FT says it has no plans of leaving the App Store, the Lab’s Andrew Phelps argued that “FT’s web app could be less about shunning Apple and more about working with it: keeping one foot inside Apple’s garden, and the other outside.” Doctor talked about the FT’s strategy as a blueprint for news orgs to use Apple as Apple uses them.


And both Phelps and Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman noted that the FT’s not the first news org to try this approach, as NPR and others have dabbled in HTML5 apps before. U.K.-based journalist Kevin Anderson reviewed the app and concluded that HTML5 will soon be “the standard that enables the next wave of cross-platform innovation."



The metered model gets a closer look: Ever since early last year, when the New York Times announced its plans to charge for its website through a metered model, Diflucan canada, mexico, india, that form of online paid content has gotten far more attention than any other. This week, French media consultant Frederic Filloux offered a useful explainer for the model, detailing how it works, what goes into publishers’ decisions about how to implement them, Online buying Diflucan, and where they fit among other paid-content models. One of its major appeals, he argued, is that advertisers see visitors who have paid up as much more valuable, paying as much as a 30 percent premium to reach them.


Filloux presented the metered model as a way of combating the overreliance on one-time, fly-by web visitors by news sites, Diflucan Dosage. British journalist Kevin Anderson echoed those concerns, calling for news orgs to “move to more honest and realistic metrics” and separate out “bounce” visitors, or those who stay on the site for only a few seconds, from their traffic figures. Meanwhile, Filloux’s metered-model math didn’t sway GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram, Diflucan results, who said he still opposes it as a fundamentally backwards-facing strategy.


Another piece of paid-content news worth noting briefly: Outgoing Fox News personality Glenn Beck’s new Internet broadcast-style network will employ a monthly subscription fee. You can check out the commentary on his venture at Mediagazer.



A local reporting crisis: The U.S. Federal Communications Commission added fuel to the long-simmering discussion over the future of accountability reporting in a digital media environment this week, releasing a study finding that the U.S. faces a critical shortage of local reporting, leaving local governmental bodies with an alarming power to influence the news agenda without being checked.


As the Lab’s Megan Garber noted, Diflucan from mexico, its bleak picture of local reporting and many of its proposed solutions were nothing new, except for its recommendation that the government make efforts to funnel advertising into local media, rather than national. Gawker’s Hamilton Nolan said now is a ripe time Diflucan Dosage, for a local news reporting resurgence and urged young reporters to stay away from media centers like New York and flock to small towns instead, and the Atlantic Wire’s Adam Clark Estes looked at how to make that resurgence a reality.



A crackup at AOL?: Henry Blodget of Business Insider calculated a tidbit about the post-merger AOL which, if true, is pretty startling: It now has a larger editorial staff than The New York Times. But just because the new, content-oriented AOL is big doesn’t mean it’s stable. A few days earlier, Business Insider published an anonymous note by an AOL staffer painting a picture of a corporate culture marked by paranoia, buy Diflucan no prescription, dissension, and incompetence.


In a more thoroughly reported story, Forbes’ Jeff Bercovici found a similarly grim situation at AOL, revealing a misunderstanding on AOL’s part about how the Huffington Post’s business model works and a dysfunctional sales department, among other problems. Business Insider came back later in the week with a conversation with an anonymous Patch editor who described low morale, Diflucan dose, sagging ad sales, poor leadership and a clueless business model.


Gawker’s Ryan Tate combed through the two pieces for a good, quick rundown of the charges levied against Arianna Huffington, and the Atlantic Wire’s John Hudson also put together a good summary of what’s wrong.



Reading roundup: Whew. Here’s what else folks were talking about this week:


— We found out a bit more about the New York Times’ new executive editor, Jill Abramson. Here are profiles and interviews from the New York Observer, get DiflucanLos Angeles TimesGuardianAdweek, Low dose Diflucan, and Women’s Wear Daily. Don’t have time for all that, Diflucan Dosage. The Atlantic Wire has a good roundup.


— A new site worth keeping an eye on, especially for sports fans: Grantland, a project of ESPN columnist Bill Simmons, launched this week. Simmons has called it a Miramax to ESPN’s Disney, and former ESPNer Dan Shanoff is optimistic about its chances. Simmons said he’s not into chasing pageviews, and here at the Lab, Tim Carmody looked at Simmons’ effort to find success at the intersection of sports and pop culture.


— Also at the Lab, Justin Ellis took a look at Hacks/Hackers and the future of the niche Q&A site.


— The Knight Digital Media Center’s Amy Gahran suggested the “Lego approach” to storytelling as a way to add context and integration to journalism.


— Finally, one great practical piece and another one to think on. At the Columbia Journalism Review, Craig Silverman got some fantastic tips from various social media experts about how to verify information on social media, and NYU j-prof Jay Rosen took stock of where “pro-am journalism” is and where it’s headed.

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[This week's review was originally posted at the Nieman Journalism Lab Purchase Bactrim, on May 20, 2011.]

Twitter on the brain: Last week, New York Times executive editor Bill Keller got a rise out of a lot of folks online with one of the shortest of his 21 career tweets: "#TwitterMakesYouStupid. Discuss." Keller revealed the purpose of his social experiment this week in a column arguing, in so many words, that Twitter may be dulling your humanity, and probably making you stupid, too. Here's the money quote: "my inner worrywart wonders whether the new technologies overtaking us may be eroding characteristics that are essentially human: our ability to reflect, real brand Bactrim online, our pursuit of meaning, genuine empathy, a sense of community connected by something deeper than snark or political affinity."

This, as you might imagine, did not go over particularly well online. Bactrim used for, There were a couple strains of reaction: Business Insider's Henry Blodget and All Twitter's Lauren Dugan argued that Twitter may indeed be changing us, but for the good, by helping make previously impossible connections.

Alexia Tsotsis of TechCrunch and Mike Masnick of Techdirt countered Keller by saying that while Twitter isn't built for deep conversations, it is quite good at providing an entry point for such discussion: "What you see publicly posted on Twitter and Facebook is just the tip of the conversation iceberg," Tsotsis said. GigaOM's Mathew Ingram, meanwhile, defended Twitter's true social nature, and sociologist Zeynep Tufekci gave a fantastic breakdown of what Twitter does and doesn't do culturally and socially, Purchase Bactrim.

Two of the most eloquent responses were provided by Nick Bilton, Bactrim brand name, one of Keller's own employees, and by Gizmodo's Mat Honan. Bilton pointed out that our brains have shown a remarkable ability to adapt quickly to new technologies without sacrificing old capacities. (Be sure to check out Keller's response afterward.)

Honan made a similar argument: Keller, he said, Bactrim schedule, is confusing the medium with the message, and Twitter, like any technology, is what you make it. "If you choose to do superficial things there, you will have superficial experiences. If you use it to communicate with others on a deeper level, you can have more meaningful experiences that make you smarter, Bactrim for sale, build lasting relationships, and generally enhance your life," Honan wrote.

Google gets more local with news Purchase Bactrim, : Google News unveiled a few interesting changes in the past week, starting with the launch of "News near you." Google has sorted news by location for a while now, but this feature will allow smartphone users to automatically get local news wherever they are. ReadWriteWeb's Dan Rowinski explained why newspapers should be worried about Google moving further onto their local-news turf, and GigaOM's Mathew Ingram criticized newspapers for not coming up with like this themselves. Cheap Bactrim, Poynter's Jeff Sonderman, on the other hand, said Google's feature is still in need of some human curation to go with its algorithmic aggregation. That's an area in which local newspapers can still dominate, he said, but it'll require some technological catchup, as well as a willingness to get over fears about linking to competitors, Bactrim over the counter.

Another change, not publicized by Google News but spotted by the folks at Search Engine Land, was the addition of an option to allow users to filter out blogs and press releases from their results. This raised the question, what exactly does Google consider a blog, Purchase Bactrim. Google told Search Engine Land it relies on a variety of factors to make that decision, especially self-identification. Bactrim coupon, Mathew Ingram ripped this classification, and urged Google to put everything that contains news together in Google News and let readers sort it out.

Fitting linking into news' workflow: A discussion about linking has been simmering on Twitter on and off over the past few weeks, and it began to come together into something useful this week. This round of the conversation started with a post by web thinker and scholar Doc Searls, who wondered why news organizations don't link out more often. Purchase Bactrim, In the comments, the Chicago Tribune's Brian Boyer suggested that one reason is that many newspapers' CMS's and workflows are print-centric, making linking logistically difficult.

CUNY j-prof C.W, purchase Bactrim online no prescription. Anderson responded that the workflow issue isn't much of an excuse, saying, as he put it on Twitter: "At this point 'linking' has been around for twenty years. The fact that this is STILL a workflow issue is almost worse than not caring." This kicked off a sprawling debate on Twitter, aptly chronicled via Storify by Mathew Ingram and Alex Byers. Bactrim wiki, Ingram also wrote a post responding to a few of the themes of resistance of links, particularly the notion that information on the web is inferior to information gained by old-fashioned reporting.

British journalist Kevin Anderson took on the workflow issue in particular, noting how outdated many newspaper CMS's are and challenging them to catch up technologically: "It’s an industrial workflow operating in a digital age, Purchase Bactrim. It’s really only down to ‘that’s the way we’ve always done it’ thinking that allows such a patently inefficient process to persist."

AOL's continued makeover: Another week, another slew of personnel moves at AOL. PaidContent's David Kaplan reported that AOL is hiring "a bunch" of new (paid) editors and shuffling some current employees around after its layoff of hundreds this spring. Overall, Kaplan wrote, doses Bactrim work, this is part of the continued effort to put the Huffington Post's stamp on AOL's editorial products.

One of the AOL entities most affected by the shifts is Seed, which had been a freelance network, but will now fall under AOL's advertising area as a business-to-business product. Purchase Bactrim, Saul Hansell, who was hired in 2009 to run Seed, is moving to HuffPo to edit its new "Big News" features. In a blog post, Bactrim long term, Hansell talked about what this means for HuffPo and for Seed.

Meanwhile, the company is also rolling out AOL Industry, a set of B2B sites covering energy, defense, and government. But wait, no prescription Bactrim online, that's not all: AOL's Patch is launching 33 new sites in states targeting the 2012 election. The hyperlocal news site Street Fight also reported that Patch is urging its editors to post more often, and a group of independent local news sites is banding together to tell the world that they are not Patch, nor anything like it.

Reading roundup: As always, plenty of other stuff get to this week, Purchase Bactrim.

— We mentioned a Pew report's reference to the Drudge Report's influence in last week's review, Where can i find Bactrim online, and this week the New York Times' David Carr marveled at Drudge's continued success without many new-media bells and whistles. Poynter's Julie Moos looked at Drudge's traffic over the years, while the Washington Post disputed Pew's numbers. ZDNet's David Gewirtz had five lessons Drudge can teach the rest of the media world.

— A few paid-content items: A Nielsen survey on what people are willing to pay for various mobile services, Poynter's Rick Edmonds on the New York Times' events marketing for its pay plan, and the Lab's Justin Ellis on paid-content lessons from small newspapers, online buying Bactrim hcl. Purchase Bactrim, — A couple of tablet-related items: Next Issue Media, a joint effort of five publishers to sell magazines on tablets, released its first set of magazines on Google Android-powered Samsung Galaxy. And here at the Lab, Ken Doctor expounded on the iPad as the "missing link" in news' digital evolution.

— Columbia University announced it will launch a local news site this summer focusing on accountability journalism, and the Lab's Megan Garber gave some more details about what Columbia's doing with it.

— The Columbia Journalism Review's Lauren Kirchner had an interesting conversation with Slate's David Plotz about Slate's aggregation efforts, and in response, Reuters' Felix Salmon made the case for valuing aggregation skills in journalists.

— This weekend's think piece is a musing by Maria Bustillos at The Awl on Wikipedia, Marshall McLuhan, communal knowledge-making, and the fate of the expert. Enjoy.

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